Sara Dolnicar
University of Queensland
AdvertisingEmpirical researchData miningMarket segmentationBusinessPsychologyAccommodationMarketingTourismGeographyPerceptionDestinationsSustainable tourismContext (language use)Competition (economics)Public relationsComputer scienceSustainabilitySocial psychologySegmentation
390Publications
75H-index
9,825Citations
Publications 504
Newest
#1Oscar Yuheng Zhu (UQ: University of Queensland)
#2Bettina Grün (WU: Vienna University of Economics and Business)H-Index: 31
Last. Sara Dolnicar (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 75
view all 3 authors...
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#1Melanie J Randle (UOW: University of Wollongong)H-Index: 17
#2Bettina Grün (WU: Vienna University of Economics and Business)H-Index: 31
Last. Sara Dolnicar (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 75
view all 3 authors...
This paper investigates heterogeneity of preferences for disability services within the theoretical framework of consumption values. We conducted interviews with people with a disability and disability service providers to develop survey items, then conducted a survey with 2000 adult Australian residents who either had a disability or were carers of a person with a disability. After conducting descriptive analyses and data-driven market segmentation, findings revealed that, at the aggregate leve...
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#1Brent W. Ritchie (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 54
#2Astrid Kemperman (TU/e: Eindhoven University of Technology)H-Index: 13
Last. Sara Dolnicar (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 75
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Tourism contributes 8% to global carbon emissions. Yet, only 10% of air passengers purchase voluntary carbon offsets. We test the effectiveness of different communication messages to increase voluntary purchasing of carbon offsets by air passengers. Results of a discrete choice experiment indicate that air passengers prefer carbon offset schemes that fund local programs (as opposed to international programs), that are effective in mitigating emissions, and are accredited. The ability to choose t...
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#1Kylie Brosnan (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 3
#2Astrid Kemperman (TU/e: Eindhoven University of Technology)H-Index: 13
Last. Sara Dolnicar (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 75
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Low survey participation from online panel members is a key challenge for market and social researchers. We identify 10 key drivers of panel members’ online survey participation from a qualitative ...
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#1Tingting Liu (NKU: Nankai University)
#2Emil Juvan (University of Primorska)H-Index: 10
Last. Sara Dolnicar (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 75
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In the home context, behaviors that serve the greater good are more often observed among people from collectivist cultures than those from individualist cultures. This tendency is assumed to transl...
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#1Csilla Demeter (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 1
#2Pei Chun Lin (NCKU: National Cheng Kung University)H-Index: 16
Last. Sara Dolnicar (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 75
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The tourism industry contributes eight percent to global carbon emissions, directly and indirectly. Indirect carbon emissions are often neglected because they are difficult to calculate. The tradit...
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#1Iana Bilynets (University of Ljubljana)H-Index: 1
#2Ljubica Knezevic Cvelbar (University of Ljubljana)H-Index: 8
Last. Sara Dolnicar (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 75
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Destination image formation theory postulates that the way tourists perceive a destination – the destination’s image – affects tourists’ destination choice. Organic destination image – which develo...
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#1Emil Juvan (University of Primorska)H-Index: 10
#2Bettina Grün (WU: Vienna University of Economics and Business)H-Index: 31
Last. Sara Dolnicar (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 75
view all 4 authors...
The harmful tourist behaviour of taking a lot of food from a buffet, but not eating it all, remains under-researched. This study gains key insights into drivers of plate waste. Observational data show that: dinner buffets are worse than break-fast buffets; the latest breakfast serving time is worse than the earliest; high-end breakfast buffets are worse than budget buffets. The first meal a guest eats at a hotel and the presence of children also lead to more plate waste. Staff offer consistent a...
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