Zena Werb
University of California, San Francisco
Matrix metalloproteinaseCancerInternal medicineEndocrinologyPathologyMolecular biologyStromal cellChemistryExtracellular matrixImmunologyMammary glandMetastasisAngiogenesisMorphogenesisCancer researchBreast cancerBiochemistryMedicineBiologyCell biology
549Publications
179H-index
109kCitations
Publications 528
Newest
#1Zhengda Sun (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 9
#2Devon A. Lawson (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 22
Last. Daniel L Cooke (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 17
view all 12 authors...
Abstract Purpose To develop a strategy of achieving targeted collection of endothelial cells (ECs) by endovascular methods and analyzing the gene expression profiles of collected single ECs. Methods and results 134 ECs and 37 leukocytes were collected from four patients' intra-iliac artery endovascular guide wires by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and analyzed by single-cell quantitative RT-PCR for expression profile of 48 genes. Compared to CD45 + leukocytes, the ECs expressed highe...
5 CitationsSource
#1Vicki Plaks (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 20
#2Jonathan Chou (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 20
Last. Zena Werb (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 179
view all 10 authors...
Currently there is no cure for a metastatic disease and it is therefore critical to target the early events that foster metastasis. It is now also recognized that a favorable microenvironment in the metastatic site, primed by the tumor, is crucial for metastasis. Our study is geared towards deciphering cellular and molecular mechanisms governing the metastatic niche that may lead to novel targeted anti-metastatic therapeutics. We utilize the multi-stage MMTV-PyMT breast cancer mouse model, which...
Source
#1Matilda F. ChanH-Index: 14
#2Zena WerbH-Index: 179
The cornea is an excellent model system to use for the analysis of wound repair because of its accessibility, lack of vascularization, and simple anatomy. Corneal injuries may involve only the superficial epithelial layer or may penetrate deeper to involve both the epithelial and stromal layers. Here we describe two well-established in vivo corneal wound models: a mechanical wound model that allows for the study of re-epithelialization and a chemical wound model that may be used to study stromal...
7 CitationsSource
#1Matilda F. ChanH-Index: 14
#2Zena WerbH-Index: 179
The accessibility and transparency of the cornea makes it a good tissue model for monitoring immunological responses using in vivo real time imaging analysis (Lee et al., 2010; Tan et al., 2013). These corneal qualities have also allowed for high-resolution in vivo imaging of non-ocular tissue transplanted into the anterior chamber of the mouse eye (Speier et al., 2008a; Speier et al., 2008b). This protocol was adapted from Speier (2008) to successfully assess real-time in vivo myeloid cell dyna...
Source
#1Zena Werb (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 179
#2Pengfei LuH-Index: 13
Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved. The tumor microenvironment plays an essential role in various stages of cancer development. This environment, composed of the extracellular matrix, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and cells of the immune system regulates the behavior of and co-evolve with tumor cells. Many of the components, including the innate and adaptive immune cells, play multifaceted roles during cancer progression and can promote or inhibit tumor developmen...
60 CitationsSource
#1Philippe Depeille (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 12
#2Linda M. Henricks (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 12
Last. Jeroen P. RooseH-Index: 32
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Roose and colleagues report that the RasGRP1 and SOS1 guanine nucleotide exchange factors have opposing roles downstream of the EGFR, with RasGRP1 restricting SOS1-induced KRAS-ERK activation and suppressing intestinal tumorigenesis.
31 CitationsSource
#1Kai Kessenbrock (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 22
#2Chih Yang Wang (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 16
Last. Zena Werb (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 179
view all 3 authors...
© 2015. Since Gross and Lapiere firstly discovered matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as important collagenolytic enzymes during amphibian tadpole morphogenesis in 1962, this intriguing family of extracellular proteinases has been implicated in various processes of developmental biology. However, the pathogenic roles of MMPs in human diseases such as cancer have also garnered widespread attention. The most straightforward explanation for their role in cancer is that MMPs, through extracellular mat...
112 CitationsSource
#2Audrey BrenotH-Index: 16
Last. Sylvain ProvotH-Index: 16
view all 7 authors...
#1Catharina Hagerling (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 8
#2Amy-Jo Casbon (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 7
Last. Zena Werb (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 179
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Cells of the innate immune system have a dual role in cancer development in both tumor initiation and progression. Innate immune cells can, on the one hand, aid malignant transformation and tumor outgrowth and, on the other hand, prevent tumor progression. The innate immune system has the ability to tune the inflammatory response and is a key player in cancer-related inflammation, which can precede the development of malignancy or be induced by oncogenic changes promoting a protumor inflammatory...
75 CitationsSource
#1Zena Werb (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 179