Alexandra McQueen
Deakin University
Paternal careMating systemAlarm signalSeasonalitySexual selectionForagingPredationEcologyPolygynyMalurusALARMQuality (business)PlumageRisk avoidanceMoultingDichromatismBiologyCrypsisZoology
8Publications
3H-index
29Citations
Publications 7
Newest
#1Ettore Camerlenghi (Monash University)
#2Alexandra McQueen (Deakin University)H-Index: 3
Last. Anne Peters (Monash University)H-Index: 38
view all 7 authors...
Multilevel societies (MLSs), where social levels are hierarchically nested within each other, are considered one of the most complex forms of animal societies. Although thought to mainly occur in mammals, it is suggested that MLSs could be under-detected in birds. Here we propose that the emergence of MLSs could be common in cooperatively breeding birds, as both systems are favoured by similar ecological and social drivers. We first investigate this proposition by systematically comparing eviden...
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#1Alexandra McQueen (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 3
#2Kaspar Delhey (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 27
Last. Anne Peters (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 38
view all 6 authors...
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#1Alexandra McQueen (Monash University)H-Index: 3
#2Kaspar Delhey (Monash University)H-Index: 27
Last. Anne Peters (Monash University)H-Index: 38
view all 5 authors...
Source
#1Alexandra McQueen (Monash University)H-Index: 3
#2Bart Kempenaers (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 71
Last. Kaspar Delhey (Monash University)H-Index: 27
view all 8 authors...
: Some birds undergo seasonal colour change by moulting twice each year, typically alternating between a cryptic, non-breeding plumage and a conspicuous, breeding plumage ('seasonal plumage colours'). We test for potential drivers of the evolution of seasonal plumage colours in all passerines (N = 5901 species, c. 60% of all birds). Seasonal plumage colours are uncommon, having appeared on multiple occasions but more frequently lost during evolution. The trait is more common in small, ground-for...
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#1Alexandra McQueenH-Index: 3
#2Bart KempenaersH-Index: 71
view all 9 authors...
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#1Alexandra McQueenH-Index: 3
Female animals may use conspicuous colours of males to assess their quality as potential mates, if colours come at a cost. This thesis explores the costs of conspicuous colours in a wild bird (the superb fairy-wren), including the need to be cautious to avoid predators, physiological costs and costs of maintaining attractive colours. In addition, this thesis shows colour change between dull and conspicuous plumage in songbirds evolves under strong sexual selection and high predation risk. This w...
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#1Alexandra McQueen (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 3
#2Annalise C. Naimo (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 2
Last. Anne Peters (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 38
view all 6 authors...
Increased predation risk is considered a cost of having conspicuous colours, affecting the anti-predator behaviour of colourful animals. However, this is difficult to test, as individual factors often covary with colour and behaviour. We used alarm call playback and behavioural observations to assess whether individual birds adjust their response to risk according to their plumage colour. Male superb fairy-wrens ( Malurus cyaneus ) change from a dull brown to conspicuous blue plumage each year, ...
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