Kosuke Honda
Jikei University School of Medicine
Internal medicineEndocrinologyGenotypeOncologyPolymorphism (computer science)Renal functionChemistryPediatricsSudden cardiac deathAzathioprineNeutropeniaStatus epilepticusGlycated hemoglobinMetabolic disorderHemodialysisEpilepsyKidney diseaseMicroscopic polyangiitisITPAHyperuricemiaUric acidKidneyBody mass indexCreatinineMetabolic syndromeGlycosuriaRENAL HYPOURICEMIAUric acid stonesConvulsive seizureRetrospective surveyUnexpected deathSerum uric acidLongitudinal cohortCoronary risk factorsIncidence (epidemiology)NephrologyTerm (time)Thiopurine methyltransferaseMedicineGene polymorphismBlood pressureGastroenterology
7Publications
1H-index
2Citations
Publications 6
Newest
#1Kosuke Honda (Jikei University School of Medicine)H-Index: 1
#2Satoru Kuriyama (Jikei University School of Medicine)H-Index: 18
Last. Takashi Yokoo (Jikei University School of Medicine)H-Index: 28
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BACKGROUND Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) acts on glucose and protein metabolism and human growth and also influences blood pressure and renal function. This study investigated whether the single-nucleotide polymorphism of IGF-1, rs35767, plays a role in metabolic syndrome indicators, including blood pressure, glucose metabolism, uric acid levels, and renal function. METHODS In this retrospective longitudinal cohort study, blood samples from 1506 Japanese individuals were collected and use...
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#2Go Kanzaki (Jikei University School of Medicine)H-Index: 12
Last. Takashi Yokoo (Jikei University School of Medicine)H-Index: 28
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Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) has been defined as a sudden/unexpected, witnessed/unwitnessed, nontraumatic, and nondrowning death in epileptic patients with/without seizure evidence and documented status epilepticus. Identified as the leading cause of epilepsy-related deaths, SUDEP cases are highly unrecognized and underreported due to diagnostic difficulty. We report a case of a successfully revived hemodialysis patient who developed cardiopulmonary arrest after a witnessed convul...
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#1Kosuke Honda (Jikei University School of Medicine)H-Index: 1
#2Akimitsu Kobayashi (Jikei University School of Medicine)H-Index: 8
Last. Satoru Kuriyama (Jikei University School of Medicine)H-Index: 18
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#1Satoru Kuriyama (Jikei University School of Medicine)H-Index: 18
#2Tomoko NakanoH-Index: 1
Last. Takashi Yokoo (Jikei University School of Medicine)H-Index: 28
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#1Kosuke HondaH-Index: 1
#2Akimitsu KobayashiH-Index: 8
Last. Takashi YokooH-Index: 28
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: A 68-year-old Japanese man was monitored for chronic kidney disease (CKD), with unknown primary disease starting in 2014. His serum creatinine (sCr) was stable at ~ 2.5 mg/dL for ~ 2 years. Two weeks before admission, he had bloody sputum, and sCr increased to 4.63 mg/dL. Soon after admission, the patient developed a high fever with pigment spots on the legs. A kidney biopsy was performed. The kidney specimens showed necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis without granuloma formation. An...
2 CitationsSource
#1Satoru Kuriyama (Jikei University School of Medicine)H-Index: 18
#2Shinichiro Nishio (Jikei University School of Medicine)H-Index: 3
Last. Takashi Yokoo (Jikei University School of Medicine)H-Index: 28
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Background: To what extent uric acid (UA) levels and/or metabolic syndrome (Mets) contribute to the onset of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is largely unknown. The present study explores how these two factors have an association with the new incidence of CKD. Methods: Study design is a cohort study. A total of 14,485 participants were eligible for the cross-sectional analysis on UA levels and the prevalence of Mets. Among those individuals, 8,223 participants without CKD and 4,839 without Mets wer...
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