Peter O. Kearns
Purdue University
Social cueTraitReligious experienceSocial environmentSubjective well-beingDevelopmental psychologyPsychologyProsocial behaviorCognitionAgreeablenessSelfCognitive psychologySelf-monitoringControl (management)PresentationValue (ethics)DaydreamEmpathic concernSelf-esteemReligiosityEmpathyInterpersonal interactionSpiritualityFantasyBelongingnessSocial psychologyOpenness to experienceSocial cognitionMoral reasoningSocial engagement
5Publications
1H-index
8Citations
Publications 5
Newest
#1Peter O. Kearns (Purdue University)H-Index: 1
#2James M. Tyler (Purdue University)H-Index: 11
Last. William G. Graziano (Purdue University)H-Index: 50
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The current studies examined the relationship between the penchant to daydream about helping others and prosocial traits and behaviour. We reasoned that fantasising about prosocial acts should be positively associated with a more prosocial disposition and real behaviour. Across both studies, the findings suggest that people who exhibit prosocial characteristics (e.g., empathic concern, fantasy/fictional empathy, moral reasoning) are more likely to fantasise about prosocial behaviour, and these c...
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#1James M. TylerH-Index: 11
#2Katherine E. AdamsH-Index: 2
Last. Peter O. KearnsH-Index: 1
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1 CitationsSource
#1James M. TylerH-Index: 11
#2Sara E. BranchH-Index: 7
Last. Peter O. KearnsH-Index: 1
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Abstract. In two studies, we examined how need to belong as a dispositional variable influences the relational interpretation of social cues and the subsequent effect on self-esteem. Across both studies, the results from a negative (vs. positive) social cue condition showed that individuals high in need to belong were more negatively affected by (i.e., lower self-esteem, social involvement, and relational value) than those low in need to belong. Results from Study 2 also showed that these negati...
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#1James M. TylerH-Index: 11
#2Peter O. KearnsH-Index: 1
Last. Miranda M. McIntyreH-Index: 2
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Abstract. Self-monitoring is a key element in interpersonal interactions, guiding how people monitor and adjust their social behavior. Compared to low self-monitors, high self-monitors are more sensitive to and use social cues to direct their self-presentations. However, little work has examined whether high self-monitors possess a heightened capacity to cognitively process self-presentation information. The goal of the current work is to address this question. After exposure to impression-relat...
8 CitationsSource