Carey K. Morewedge
Boston University
Public economicsExperimental psychologyFeelingSocial perceptionConsumption (economics)Developmental psychologyAttributionBusinessEconometricsArtificial intelligencePsychologyHealth careActuarial scienceEconomicsCognitionSelfMicroeconomicsImpact biasCognitive psychologyCognitive biasPerceptionPsychological interventionAffective forecastingHappinessDebiasingEvent (probability theory)Game designSocial psychologySocial cognition
100Publications
27H-index
3,073Citations
Publications 89
Newest
#1Eva C. BuechelH-Index: 8
#2Carey K. MorewedgeH-Index: 27
Last. Joachim VosgerauH-Index: 14
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#1Karim S. KassamH-Index: 17
#2Carey K. MorewedgeH-Index: 27
Last. Daniel T. GilbertH-Index: 65
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This research investigated whether people are more likely to attribute events to external agents when events are negative rather than neutral or positive. Participants more often believed that ultimatum game partners were humans rather than computers when the partners offered unusually unfavorable divisions than unusually favorable divisions (Experiment 1A), even when their human partners had no financial stake in the game (Experiment 1B). In subsequent experiments, participants were most likely...
139 CitationsSource
#1Carey K. Morewedge (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 27
#2Lisa L. Shu (Harvard University)H-Index: 11
Last. Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 79
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People typically demand more to relinquish the goods they own than they would be willing to pay to acquire those goods if they did not already own them (the endowment effect). The standard economic explanation of this phenomenon is that people expect the pain of relinquishing a good to be greater than the pleasure of acquiring it (the loss aversion account). The standard psychological explanation is that people are reluctant to relinquish the goods they own simply because they associate those go...
344 CitationsSource
#1Carey K. Morewedge (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 27
#2Karim S. Kassam (Harvard University)H-Index: 17
Last. Eugene M. Caruso (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 21
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When people are asked to assess or compare the value of experienced or hypothetical events, one of the most intriguing observations is their apparent insensitivity to event duration. The authors propose that duration insensitivity occurs when stimuli are evaluated in isolation because they typically lack comparison information. People should be able to evaluate the duration of stimuli in isolation, however, when stimuli are familiar and evoke comparison information. The results of 3 experiments ...
51 CitationsSource
#1Carey K. MorewedgeH-Index: 27
#2Young Eun HuhH-Index: 5
Last. Joachim VosgerauH-Index: 14
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#1Carey K. Morewedge (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 27
#2Michael I. Norton (Harvard University)H-Index: 71
This research investigated laypeople's interpretation of their dreams. Participants from both Eastern and Western cultures believed that dreams contain hidden truths (Study 1) and considered dreams to provide more meaningful information about the world than similar waking thoughts (Studies 2 and 3). The meaningfulness attributed to specific dreams, however, was moderated by the extent to which the content of those dreams accorded with participants' preexisting beliefs-from the theories they endo...
92 CitationsSource
Jan 1, 2009 in ICWSM (International Conference on Weblogs and Social Media)
#1Elliot Onn (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)
#2Carey K. Morewedge (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 27
The present study demonstrates how the emotional content of search terms and their eventual results affects the breadth We observed the quantity of results selected by users. In a random sample of queries from the Microsoft LiveSearch search engine, 7,021 queries were evaluated using a dictionary with valence and arousal ratings. The number of search results selected was regressed on the valence and arousal of the search terms. We additionally of results based on the position in the search resul...
#1Carey K. Morewedge (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 27
#2Michael E. Clear (Harvard University)H-Index: 1
Violations of religious doctrine may not only be perceived to violate the laws of one’s religion, but also to be morally wrong. Just as actions considered acceptable outside of social contexts are often considered unacceptable when they affect other people, believers perceiving God in anthropomorphic terms were more likely to judge violations of their religious doctrine to be morally unacceptable than believers not perceiving God in anthropomorphic terms. Devout Christians reported the extent to...
70 CitationsSource
#1Carey K. MorewedgeH-Index: 27
#2Daniel T. GilbertH-Index: 65
Last. Timothy D. WilsonH-Index: 79
view all 4 authors...