Abhishek Pathak
University of Dundee
AdvertisingFeelingProduct (category theory)ArtAssociation (psychology)BusinessLogos Bible SoftwarePsychologyTaste (sociology)MarketingSound symbolismCognitive psychologyPerceptionAge of AcquisitionCounterfeitVowel lengthNeuromarketingBrand namesLogoLinguisticsBrand management
16Publications
4H-index
46Citations
Publications 18
Newest
#1Abhishek Pathak (Dund.: University of Dundee)H-Index: 4
#2Gemma A. Calvert (NTU: Nanyang Technological University)H-Index: 35
Last. Jaewoo Park (Chu-Dai: Chuo University)H-Index: 5
view all 4 authors...
Abstract null null A large body of literature now shows the association of various linguistic attributes (e.g., vowel length, voiced consonants) with tastes (e.g., sweet, bitter). Despite the knowledge gathered so far in this field, no overarching explanation has been provided. Here we reveal that taste-speech sound associations depend on the age of acquisition of specific phonemes. Speech is a complex ability acquired over many years; some phonemes are easy to produce (e.g., /p/, /m/), whereas ...
Source
#1Abhishek Pathak (Dund.: University of Dundee)H-Index: 4
#2Kosuke Motoki (Miyagi University)H-Index: 8
Last. Gemma A. Calvert (NTU: Nanyang Technological University)H-Index: 35
view all 4 authors...
Source
#1Abhishek Pathak (Dund.: University of Dundee)H-Index: 4
#2Gemma A. Calvert (NTU: Nanyang Technological University)H-Index: 35
Last. Kosuke Motoki (Miyagi University)H-Index: 8
view all 3 authors...
Abstract A number of studies have now examined the in/out effect, whereby “inwards” spoken words imitating an inwards articulatory motion (akin to the swallowing motion) are typically rated higher on dimensions of edibility, palatability, likeability, approach and willingness to pay. The reverse is true of so-called “outwards” words mimicking oral expulsive motion. This effect, though robust and replicable, fails to take into account other well-known sound symbolic associations, which have also ...
2 CitationsSource
#1Marin Uchida (Miyagi University)
#2Abhishek Pathak (Dund.: University of Dundee)H-Index: 4
Last. Kosuke Motoki (Tohoku University)H-Index: 8
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Source
#1Kosuke Motoki (Miyagi University)H-Index: 8
#2Jaewoo Park (Musashi University)H-Index: 5
Last. Charles Spence (University of Oxford)H-Index: 129
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Abstract The interest in healthy food has grown rapidly amongst both consumers and food manufacturers in recent years. However, which foods should be considered healthy is sometimes ambiguous. Identifying those factors that influence the perception of healthfulness is of interest both to consumers and to food manufacturers. Previous research has shown that product-intrinsic (e.g., nutrition) and product-extrinsic (e.g., the colour of the packaging) factors can shape the consumers’ perception of ...
4 CitationsSource
#1Paula AlmironH-Index: 1
#2Francisco Barbosa Escobar (BI Norwegian Business School)H-Index: 1
Last. Carlos VelascoH-Index: 39
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Abstract One common definition of premiumness is as a higher quality and more expensive variant of a product than other members of the category or reference class. Brand associations, such as premiumness, can effectively be conveyed by means of different sensory cues or brand touchpoints (e.g., colours, sounds, weight). However, to date, research linking the sound of a product’s packaging with premiumness is sparse. In the present study, we demonstrate for the first time that consumers associate...
3 CitationsSource
#1Abhishek Pathak (Dund.: University of Dundee)H-Index: 4
#2Gemma A. Calvert (NTU: Nanyang Technological University)H-Index: 35
Throughout the history of languages, poets and writers have used linguistic tools to enhance euphony in their creations. One of the widely used tools to convey melody in any written (or spoken) creative art form is the use of long vowels. This paper examines the linkages between long (vs. short) vowel sounds and taste expectations of sweetness. Across four studies, we demonstrate that people expect products with brand names containing long vowels to taste sweeter than those including short vowel...
Source
#1Carlos Velasco (BI Norwegian Business School)H-Index: 39
#2Abhishek Pathak (Dund.: University of Dundee)H-Index: 4
Last. Andrew J. Elliot (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 109
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Research on aesthetic science has demonstrated that people generally prefer symmetrical over asymmetrical compositions. However, it remains unclear whether and how such compositions relate to the c...
3 CitationsSource
#1Gemma A. Calvert (NTU: Nanyang Technological University)H-Index: 35
#2Abhishek Pathak (Dund.: University of Dundee)H-Index: 4
Last. Eamon P. FulcherH-Index: 9
view all 3 authors...
#1Gemma A. Calvert (NTU: Nanyang Technological University)H-Index: 35
#2Geraldine TrufilH-Index: 2
Last. Eamon P. FulcherH-Index: 9
view all 4 authors...
IMPULSE is a novel method for detecting affective responses to dynamic audiovisual content. It is an implicit reaction time test that is carried out while an audiovisual clip (e.g., a television commercial) plays in the background and measures feelings that are congruent or incongruent with the content of the clip. The results of three experiments illustrate the following four advantages of IMPULSE over self-reported and biometric methods: (1) being less susceptible to typical confounds associat...
3 CitationsSource