James M. Tyler
Purdue University
Social environmentSocial perceptionSocial relationDevelopmental psychologyPsychologyInterpersonal communicationCognitionSelfWork (electrical)Cognitive psychologyPersonalityPresentationValue (ethics)ConversationSelf-esteemDeceptionSexual objectificationImpression managementPresentational and representational actingBelongingnessFunction (engineering)Social psychologySocial cognitionInterpersonal relationship
44Publications
11H-index
510Citations
Publications 44
Newest
#1James M. Tyler (Purdue University)H-Index: 11
#2Katherine E. Adams (Purdue University)H-Index: 2
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#1James M. Tyler (Purdue University)H-Index: 11
#2Rachel M. Calogero (UKC: University of Kent)H-Index: 38
Last. Katherine E. Adams (Purdue University)H-Index: 2
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Women are sexually objectified when viewed and treated by others as mere objects. Abundant research has examined the negative consequences of being the target of sexual objectification; however, limited attention has focused on the person doing the objectification. Our focus is on the agent and how self-regulatory resources influence sexual objectification. Consistent with prior evidence, we reasoned that people have a well-learned automatic response to objectify sexualized women, and as such, w...
8 CitationsSource
#1Jennifer Gill Rosier (JMU: James Madison University)H-Index: 6
#2James M. Tyler (Purdue University)H-Index: 11
ABSTRACTOne specific area of communication that has the potential to elicit a wide range of outcomes, such as enhancing a couple's feelings of intimacy, offending one or both partners causing conflict, improving the communication climate within the relationship, or embarrassing the partners involved, is the discussion of sex. The current project theorized how to initiate and maintain sexual coaching conversations, taught participants the components of skillful and unskillful messages in an onlin...
7 CitationsSource
#1Kastherine E. Adams (Purdue University)
#2James M. Tyler (Purdue University)H-Index: 11
Evidence indicates that people are motivated to interpret environmental cues to belongingness, but doing so can be challenging. Prior evidence shows that the self's regulatory resources are consumed when interpreting complex facial displays; with this study, we examined how the depletion of such resources may impact the ability to interpret vocal tones. Results showed that depletion decreased accuracy in identifying complex (vs. simple) vocal cues, which extends prior work and offers a more comp...
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#1James M. TylerH-Index: 11
#2Sara E. BranchH-Index: 7
Last. Peter O. KearnsH-Index: 1
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Abstract. In two studies, we examined how need to belong as a dispositional variable influences the relational interpretation of social cues and the subsequent effect on self-esteem. Across both studies, the results from a negative (vs. positive) social cue condition showed that individuals high in need to belong were more negatively affected by (i.e., lower self-esteem, social involvement, and relational value) than those low in need to belong. Results from Study 2 also showed that these negati...
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#1James M. TylerH-Index: 11
#2Peter O. KearnsH-Index: 1
Last. Miranda M. McIntyreH-Index: 2
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Abstract. Self-monitoring is a key element in interpersonal interactions, guiding how people monitor and adjust their social behavior. Compared to low self-monitors, high self-monitors are more sensitive to and use social cues to direct their self-presentations. However, little work has examined whether high self-monitors possess a heightened capacity to cognitively process self-presentation information. The goal of the current work is to address this question. After exposure to impression-relat...
8 CitationsSource
#1James M. Tyler (Purdue University)H-Index: 11
#2Miranda M. McIntyre (Purdue University)H-Index: 2
Last. Kaleigh J. Sands (Purdue University)H-Index: 1
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We examined whether high self-monitors cognitively process self-presentation-related information and concepts more readily than low self-monitors. Results across three studies indicate that compared to low self-monitors, high self-monitors have greater cognitive access to self-presentation-related information and concepts. High selfmonitors produced more words related to self-presentation in a shorter amount of time (Study1)andinacognitiveloadcondition(Study2).Inbothstudies, thenumberofwords did...
1 CitationsSource
#1Laura E. VanderDrift (SU: Syracuse University)H-Index: 13
#2James M. Tyler (Purdue University)H-Index: 11
Last. Linglu Ma (Purdue University)H-Index: 1
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Individuals' self-concepts are inextricably entwined with their relationships [Reis, H. T., Collins, W. A., & Berscheid, E. (2000). Psychological Bulletin, 126, 844–872], and thus it stands to reason that information about close relationships will figure prominently in individuals' self-presentational efforts. Yet, little is known about how individuals present their relationship. We examined whether individuals present information about their relationship differently as a function of both the ta...
1 CitationsSource
#1James M. Tyler (Purdue University)H-Index: 11
#2Sara E. Branch (Purdue University)H-Index: 7
ABSTRACTWe examined whether relational perceptions (social involvement, relational value, interaction experience) differ depending on interaction acceptance goals (establish, maintain, or repair). Results indicated that relational perceptions were more positive in the maintain condition compared to the establish condition, which in turn was more positive than the repair condition. The data also supported a moderated mediation model: the indirect effects of social involvement and relational value...
3 CitationsSource
Sep 3, 2012 in PASSAT (Privacy, Security, Risk and Trust)
#1Timothy La Fond (Purdue University)H-Index: 7
#2Dan Roberts (Purdue University)H-Index: 1
Last. Stacey L. Connaughton (Purdue University)H-Index: 16
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In the past decade, we have witnessed an explosive growth of the Web, online communities, and social media. This has led to a substantial increase in the range and scope of electronic communication and distributed collaboration. In distributed teams, social communication is thought to be critical for creating and sustaining relationships, but there is often limited opportunity for team members to build interpersonal connections through face to face interactions. Although social science research ...
4 CitationsSource