Jennifer D. McCullough
Saginaw Valley State University
Internet privacyCreativityAttachment theoryExtraversion and introversionDevelopmental psychologyNonverbal communicationHumanitiesPsychologyContent analysisMarketingInterpersonal communicationMatching (statistics)Human factors and ergonomicsCognitionConstruct (philosophy)Cognitive complexityDual process theoryCognitive psychologyInjury preventionStructure (mathematical logic)NarrativePerspective (graphical)Eysenck Personality QuestionnairePerceptionOrder (business)PhrasePersonnel selectionSocial supportTest (assessment)SympathyElaborationQuality (business)PsychoticismGriefCharacter (mathematics)HelpfulnessJob resumesEmotional upsetAn acquaintanceGender biasMessage processingReceptive languagePoison controlEmotional supportProblem severityMultiple factorsPerson centerednessProcess informationCommunication theoryProcess (engineering)Through-the-lens meteringChannel (programming)Impression managementReading (process)Presentational and representational actingSocial psychologySocial skillsInformation processingSituational ethicsNeuroticismDUAL (cognitive architecture)
16Publications
6H-index
176Citations
Publications 16
Newest
#1Jennifer D. McCullough (Saginaw Valley State University)H-Index: 6
Sympathy cards are a popular channel by which grief support is communicated. In order to better understand the supportive messages used in sympathy cards, a content analysis was performed. The mess...
Source
#1Ranjana Dutta (Saginaw Valley State University)H-Index: 3
#2Travis J. Pashak (Saginaw Valley State University)H-Index: 6
Last. Michael R. HeronH-Index: 1
view all 5 authors...
3 CitationsSource
#1Amanda J. HolmstromH-Index: 18
#2Graham D. Bodie (LSU: Louisiana State University)H-Index: 26
Last. Jennifer Gill Rosier (JMU: James Madison University)H-Index: 6
view all 7 authors...
To test a recently proposed dual-process theory of supportive communication outcomes, participants (N = 328) assumed they had experienced a mildly or moderately problematic situation. They then evaluated supportive messages varying in person centeredness, purportedly provided by either an acquaintance or a friend. Participants’ perceived support availability (PSA) was also assessed. As predicted, the recipient factor (PSA) individually and in conjunction with the contextual factor (problem sever...
14 CitationsSource
#1Lisa K. Hanasono (BGSU: Bowling Green State University)H-Index: 8
#2Brant R. Burleson (Purdue University)H-Index: 58
Last. Jennie Gill Rosier (JMU: James Madison University)H-Index: 1
view all 7 authors...
Perceived support availability (PSA), a general belief about the likelihood that social support will be available when needed, is associated with numerous processes and outcomes of supportive communication. Currently, however, there is little understanding of the factors that contribute to this belief. Numerous studies have reported gender differences in PSA, with women generally indicating that they see support as more available than do men; in turn, gender differences in PSA have been cited to...
6 CitationsSource
#1Graham D. Bodie (LSU: Louisiana State University)H-Index: 26
#2Brant R. Burleson (Purdue University)H-Index: 58
Last. Jennifer Gill Rosier (JMU: James Madison University)H-Index: 6
view all 7 authors...
We report tests of hypotheses derived from a theory of supportive communication outcomes that maintains the effects of supportive messages are moderated by factors influencing the motivation and ability to process these messages. Participants in two studies completed a measure of cognitive complexity, which provided an assessment of processing ability, and reported their degree of upset with a problem situation, which was hypothesized to impact both motivation and ability; they subsequently eval...
39 CitationsSource
#1Graham D. Bodie (LSU: Louisiana State University)H-Index: 26
#2Brant R. Burleson (Purdue University)H-Index: 58
Last. Jerilyn R. Mincy (Purdue University)H-Index: 1
view all 8 authors...
This article reports tests of hypotheses derived from a theory of supportive message outcomes that maintains that the effects of supportive messages are moderated by factors influencing the motivation and ability to process these messages. Participants (N = 331) completed measures of attachment style, which provided individual-level assessments of processing motivation, and responded to either a mildly or moderately severe problem, which manipulated situational motivation. They subsequently eval...
26 CitationsSource
#1Brant R. Burleson (Purdue University)H-Index: 58
#2Lisa K. Hanasono (BGSU: Bowling Green State University)H-Index: 8
Last. Jennifer Gill Rosier (Purdue University)H-Index: 6
view all 7 authors...
Women process information about support situations and messages more extensively than men, but little is known about whether these gender differences reflect underlying differences in processing ability, motivation, or both. Two studies examined information processing by men and women in both relatively less serious and more serious situations. Participants in Study 1 responded to more and less serious experimental scenarios, whereas participants in Study 2 reported on a recent bereavement situa...
18 CitationsSource
#1Brant R. BurlesonH-Index: 58
#2Graham D. BodieH-Index: 26
Last. Jennifer Gill RosierH-Index: 6
view all 7 authors...
3 Citations
#1John O. Greene (Purdue University)H-Index: 16
#2Melanie Morgan (Purdue University)H-Index: 6
Last. Angela R. Graves (Oral Roberts University)H-Index: 5
view all 5 authors...
It is commonly recognized that messages are simultaneously patterned and creative, but studies of message production have tended to focus on repetitive features of messages, to the relative exclusion of examination of their novel characteristics. This study is concerned with creative facility—the ability readily to construct novel, appropriate messages. In order to investigate this phenomenon, subjects produced a series of simple SITUATION-ACTION-BECAUSE narratives and also completed measures of...
5 CitationsSource
#1James M. Tyler (Purdue University)H-Index: 11
#2Jennifer D. McCullough (Purdue University)H-Index: 6
The authors investigate the earliest stage of the job-screening process—the resume, which represents an applicant’s initial self-presentation efforts, and examine whether women are evaluated more negatively on hiring-related decisions when their resume communicates an identity that violates gender stereotypic prescriptions. This question is important because resumes determine whether an applicant is interviewed and because, in general, women suffer negative sanctions when their behavior violates...
20 CitationsSource