J.G.M. van Mier
Delft University of Technology
Ultimate tensile strengthFinite element methodLattice (order)BrittlenessComposite materialShrinkageGeotechnical engineeringMaterials scienceLattice model (physics)SofteningUniaxial tensionFracture (geology)Aggregate (composite)Solid mechanicsCementMechanicsCrackingFracture mechanicsDuctilityStructural engineering
63Publications
21H-index
2,741Citations
Publications 73
Newest
#4J.G.M. van MierH-Index: 21
#1J.G.M. van Mier (TU Delft: Delft University of Technology)H-Index: 21
The fracture processes in concrete subjected to uniaxial tension or compression are complex and develops in three-dimensions. In both loading cases, after an initially linear elastic stage, three fracture stages are distinguished. They are: (stable) microcracking (pre-peak), (unstable) macro-crack growth, and residual stress. Macro-crack growth and peak stress are affected by boundary conditions and specimen size. Ergo, softening is a structural property and cannot be used as parameter in popula...
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#1C. Iacono (TU Delft: Delft University of Technology)H-Index: 2
#2Lambertus J. Sluys (TU Delft: Delft University of Technology)H-Index: 54
Last. J.G.M. van MierH-Index: 21
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Abstract The parameters identification problem of the gradient-enhanced continuum damage model is examined by means of an inverse analysis. Different related issues are analyzed: (i) the investigation of the limits of applicability and predictability of the adopted numerical model and (ii) the problem of objectively extracting material properties from a structural response. A necessary condition for an adequate identification of the model parameters is the well-posedness of the inverse problem. ...
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Abstract Size/scale effects on the fracture of concrete subjected to uniaxial tension are studied by means of analyses with the Delft lattice beam model and compared to recent experimental results. Using a simple local elastic–purely brittle material global softening behaviour is calculated. The effect of deterministic and statistical contributions to size effect is studied by implementing different degrees of heterogeneity to the lattices. They vary from ‘homogeneous’ regular triangular lattice...
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#1Tomoki Shiotani (TU Delft: Delft University of Technology)H-Index: 25
#2Jan Bisschop (TU Delft: Delft University of Technology)H-Index: 11
Last. J.G.M. van MierH-Index: 21
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In optical microscopy and acoustic emission (AE) experiments, the development in time and space of drying shrinkage cracks in hardened cement paste and a cement composite containing mono-sized glass particles has been studied. The results indicate two types of restraint, i.e. self-restraint of the specimen/structure, and aggregate restraint. In plain cement paste cracks initially develop perpendicular to the drying surface, but may subsequently grow parallel to the drying surfaces. In composites...
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#1J.G.M. van MierH-Index: 21
#2Jacky MazarsH-Index: 30
Last. R. de BorstH-Index: 30
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#1G. Lilliu (TU Delft: Delft University of Technology)H-Index: 3
#2J.G.M. van Mier (TU Delft: Delft University of Technology)H-Index: 21
A 3D beam lattice model is used for simulating fracture processes in concrete, which is schematized as a three-phase material (aggregate, interfacial transition zone and matrix). Numerical experiments are conducted varying the particle density. The obtained results show that, with increasing particle density, the peak-load decreases and the response is more ductile. This appears to be related to the amount of de-bonding. As a matter of fact, when the strength of the interface transition zone is ...
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#2J.G.M. van MierH-Index: 21
Drying of porous media, such as cement paste, is observed through different types of experiments at meso- and micro-scales. Important aspect is the transport of water through the porous material. The results from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) drying experiments have been numerically modeled by means of Lattice Gas Automaton (LGA) from Statistical Physics. It is shown that numerical modeling with LGA can be an approximate fit to the moisture flow, through the capillaries, in the cement paste s...
#1Ching S. Chang (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 45
#2T.K. Wang (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 3
Last. J.G.M. van Mier (TU Delft: Delft University of Technology)H-Index: 21
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Abstract Stress–strain relationships used for modeling the mechanical behavior of materials have been traditionally derived following a phenomenological approach, without explicit considerations of the micro-structures of material. Here, we adopt a micro-structural mechanics approach to model the development of fracture in concrete. The continuum is assumed to have an underlying micro-structure of lattice type, which has been demonstrated as a useful description for concrete fracture. A finite e...
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#1Ching S. Chang (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 45
#2T.K. Wang (USP: University of São Paulo)H-Index: 3
Last. J.G.M. van Mier (TU Delft: Delft University of Technology)H-Index: 21
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Abstract In the accompanying paper [C.S. Chang, T.K. Wang, L.J. Sluys, J.G.M. van Mier, J. Eng. Fract. Mech. (this volume)], the theoretical aspects of a stress–strain model are described based on a microstructural approach. A finite element formulation was presented that incorporates the developed stress–strain relationship. In this paper the results of finite element analyses are described. The paper is focused on two main issues: the difference between the micropolar and the non-polar microst...
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