Francesca Gino
Harvard University
CreativityFeelingBusinessPsychologyEconomicsMarketingInterpersonal communicationPolitical scienceCognitive psychologyMoral psychologyNegotiationMoralityPerceptionCheatingDishonestyDeceptionTask (project management)Public relationsMoral disengagementSocial psychology
367Publications
57H-index
10.9kCitations
Publications 357
Newest
Trust is a key ingredient in decision making, as it allows us to rely on the information we receive. Although trust is usually viewed as a positive element of decision making, we suggest that its effects on memory are costly rather than beneficial. Across nine studies using three different manipulations of trust and distrust and three different memory paradigms, we find that trust reduces memory performance as compared with distrust. In Study 1, trust leads to higher acceptance rates of misinfor...
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#1Celia Chui (HEC Montréal)
#2Maryam Kouchaki (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 14
Last. Francesca Gino (Harvard University)H-Index: 57
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Abstract In many spheres of life, from applying for a job to participating in an athletic contest to vying for a date, we face competition. Does the size of the competition pool affect our propensity to behave unethically in our pursuit of the prize? We propose that it does. Across four studies, we found that a larger (vs. smaller) number of competitors led participants to cheat more in a performance task to earn undeserved money. We also explored the psychological mechanisms of competition pool...
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#1David M. Markowitz (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 7
#2Maryam Kouchaki (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 14
Last. Francesca Gino (Harvard University)H-Index: 57
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#1Daniel H. Stein (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 2
#2Juliana Schroeder (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 10
Last. Michael I. Norton (Harvard University)H-Index: 49
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From Catholics performing the sign of the cross since the 4th century to Americans reciting the Pledge of Allegiance since the 1890s, group rituals (i.e., predefined sequences of symbolic actions) have strikingly consistent features over time. Seven studies (N = 4,213) document the sacrosanct nature of rituals: Because group rituals symbolize sacred group values, even minor alterations to them provoke moral outrage and punishment. In Pilot Studies A and B, fraternity members who failed to comple...
2 CitationsSource
#1Ata JamiH-Index: 3
#2Maryam Kouchaki (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 14
Last. Francesca Gino (Harvard University)H-Index: 57
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#1Jon M. JachimowiczH-Index: 7
#2Julia Lee Cunningham (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 1
Last. Francesca GinoH-Index: 57
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To get to work, employees need to commute. Across the globe, the average commute is 38 minutes each way per day. It is well known that longer commutes have negative effects on employees’ well-being and job-related outcomes. Yet, commuting may not similarly affect all employees, since some of them may naturally engage in behaviors to offset the negative effects of longer commutes. Drawing on psychological research on self-control, we theorize how engaging in future-oriented thinking about the tas...
2 CitationsSource
#2Francesca Gino (Harvard University)H-Index: 57
Last. Pier Luigi Sacco (IULM University of Milan)H-Index: 20
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Abstract We conduct a field experiment involving 143, 9-years old children in their classrooms. Children are requested to flip a coin in private and receive a big or a small prize depending on the outcome they report. Comparing the actual and theoretical distribution of reported wins, we find evidence of cheating at the aggregate level. By using behavioral data gathered on previous and subsequent meetings with the same children, we are able to explore the relationship between cheating behavior, ...
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#1Michael Yeomans (Harvard University)H-Index: 6
#2Julia A. Minson (Harvard University)H-Index: 11
Last. Francesca Gino (Harvard University)H-Index: 57
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Abstract We examine “conversational receptiveness” – the use of language to communicate one’s willingness to thoughtfully engage with opposing views. We develop an interpretable machine-learning algorithm to identify the linguistic profile of receptiveness (Studies 1A-B). We then show that in contentious policy discussions, government executives who were rated as more receptive - according to our algorithm and their partners, but not their own self-evaluations - were considered better teammates,...
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