Richard Sheldrake
Institute of Education
Self-efficacyAcademic writingCalibration (statistics)Ethnic groupDevelopmental psychologyMathematics educationPsychologyApplied linguisticsFirst languageMillennium Cohort Study (United States)LimitingPedagogyCohort studyChemistry (relationship)PerceptionPsychological interventionPraiseSelf-enhancementAgreementExplanatory powerSelf-conceptDisadvantageSelf-esteemEveryday lifeCompulsory educationEmpathyContext (language use)National curriculumTask (project management)DisadvantagedField (Bourdieu)Latent transition analysisIntrinsic motivationScience teachingSelf evaluationMathematics instructionLongitudinal sampleMathematical abilitySecondary levelEarly adolescentsLongitudinal cohortAge differencesPredictor variablesSelf beliefsDifferential effectsAttitudes beliefsCuriositySocial mobilityScience educationMedical educationAnxietyCohortSocial psychologyNatural (music)Achievement testRelevance (information retrieval)Teaching methodDifferential (mechanical device)Environmental ethics
13Publications
7H-index
131Citations
Publications 11
Newest
#1Karin ZotzmannH-Index: 5
Last. Richard Sheldrake (IOE: Institute of Education)H-Index: 7
view all 2 authors...
Abstract Motivational theories highlight the importance of students’ confidence, where lower confidence can be limiting, and also students’ beliefs about academic writing, which may reflect goals as well as practices to achieve them. Nevertheless, relatively few studies have considered these areas across students with English as a first language (L1 students) and students with first languages other than English (L2 students). In order to gain new insights, 122 students of applied linguistics wer...
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#1Richard Sheldrake (IOE: Institute of Education)H-Index: 7
#2Michael Reiss (IOE: Institute of Education)H-Index: 35
Biology education aims to inspire interest, curiosity, and understanding about the natural world, foster children’s interests and orientations towards supporting and protecting nature, and support ...
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#1Richard Sheldrake (IOE: Institute of Education)H-Index: 7
In order to gain insight into which children aspire towards science-related careers and how these aspirations change over time, 7820 children in England from the nationally representative Millennium Cohort Study were considered. Few children (8.6% of the cohort) consistently expressed science-related career aspirations at age 11 and again at age 14; more children (15.7%) changed from expressing other (non-science) aspirations at age 11 to express science-related aspirations at age 14; other chil...
3 CitationsSource
#1Richard Sheldrake (IOE: Institute of Education)H-Index: 7
#2Tamjid Mujtaba (IOE: Institute of Education)H-Index: 12
Science-related careers are often considered to be less accessible by many children. More research is needed to distinguish any influences from different aspects of life so that support and/or interventions can be focused to help mitigate any disadvantage and inaccessibility. In order to gain greater understanding of constraints or influences on children’s aspirations towards science-related careers, a nationally-representative cohort of 7820 children in England was considered at age 11 and at a...
Source
#1Richard Sheldrake (IOE: Institute of Education)H-Index: 7
#2Tamjid Mujtaba (IOE: Institute of Education)H-Index: 12
Last. Michael Reiss (IOE: Institute of Education)H-Index: 35
view all 3 authors...
Many countries desire more students to study science subjects, although relatively few students decide to study non-compulsory physics at upper-secondary school and at university. To gain insight into students’ intentions to study non-compulsory physics, a longitudinal sample (covering 2258 students across 88 secondary schools in England) was surveyed in year 8 (age 12/13) and again in year 10 (age 14/15). Predictive modelling highlighted that perceived advice, perceived utility of physics, inte...
11 CitationsSource
#1Karin ZotzmannH-Index: 5
Last. Richard SheldrakeH-Index: 7
view all 2 authors...
#1Richard Sheldrake (IOE: Institute of Education)H-Index: 7
#2Tamjid Mujtaba (IOE: Institute of Education)H-Index: 12
Last. Michael Reiss (IOE: Institute of Education)H-Index: 35
view all 3 authors...
More people studying and working within science are desired in numerous countries, although it remains less clear how educators can help. Analysis considered nationally-representative samples of students in England, aged 15 (Year 11), from 2006 and 2015. On both occasions, accounting for students’ background and other views, students’ perceived utility of science most strongly and positively associated with their science-related career aspirations, while students’ reports of encountering differe...
24 CitationsSource
An enhanced understanding of what predicts students' confidence, and what predicts specific cases of under-confidence or over-confidence, benefits educational practices and motivational theories. For secondary-school students in England, confidence expressed as self-concept was most strongly predicted by (intrinsic) interest, perceived encouragement (praise), and subject-comparisons for mathematics, and by praise, interest, and peer-comparisons for science, controlling for achievement and variou...
5 CitationsSource
ABSTRACTUnderstanding students’ intentions to study science at upper-secondary school, at university, and to follow science careers continues as a central concern for international science education. Prior research has highlighted that students’ science confidence has been associated with their intentions to study science further, although under-confidence and over-confidence (lower or higher confidence than expected, given someone’s attainment) have not been considered in detail. Accordingly, t...
13 CitationsSource
#1Richard Sheldrake (Lond: University of London)H-Index: 7
#2Tamjid Mujtaba (Lond: University of London)H-Index: 12
Last. Michael Reiss (Lond: University of London)H-Index: 35
view all 3 authors...
Increasing the number of students who study mathematics once it is no longer compulsory remains a priority for England. A longitudinal cohort from England (1085 students) was surveyed at Years 10 and 12. Students' self-beliefs of ability influenced their GCSE mathematics grades and their intended and actual mathematics subject-choices; the degree of under-confidence or over-confidence related to these self-beliefs was also influential. Additional factors that significantly influenced students' i...
21 CitationsSource