Haonan Lin
Boston University
Deep learningPlasmonChemical specificitySignalOpticsSpectral resolutionBiophysicsFrame (networking)ChirpThroughput (business)MicroscopyPipeline (computing)Artificial intelligenceHyperspectral imagingPixelFemtosecondRaman scatteringPhasorSpectral signatureUltrashort pulseChemistryMaterials scienceLipid dropletGlycated hemoglobinMatrix completionBottleneckMetabolic imagingComputer visionMoleculeMicrosecondRaman spectroscopyWord error rateComputer scienceOptoelectronicsBiomoleculeLaserChemical imagingComputational biologySegmentationTime delay and integration
21Publications
6H-index
145Citations
Publications 18
Newest
#1Haonan Lin (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 6
#2Hyeon Jeong Lee (ZJU: Zhejiang University)H-Index: 10
Last. Ji-Xin Cheng (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 83
view all 11 authors...
Label-free vibrational imaging by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) provides unprecedented insight into real-time chemical distributions. Specifically, SRS in the fingerprint region (400–1800 cm−1) can resolve multiple chemicals in a complex bio-environment. However, due to the intrinsic weak Raman cross-sections and the lack of ultrafast spectral acquisition schemes with high spectral fidelity, SRS in the fingerprint region is not viable for studying living cells or large-scale tissue samples. ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Haonan Lin (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 6
#2Yuying Tan (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 6
Last. Ji-Xin Cheng (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 83
view all 4 authors...
Hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (hSRS) is a label-free microspectroscopic modality that enables live-cell metabolic imaging with chemical specificity. Yet, hSRS in the CH region has low throughput and poor chemical specificity, which limits its application to a broader range of metabolic studies. We propose a high-content, high-throughput hSRS imaging method by a sparsity-driven spectral unmixing and active spectral sub-sampling. We unprecedently generate chemical maps of four major me...
Source
#1Cheng Zong (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 18
#2Chi Zhang (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 57
Last. Ji-Xin Cheng (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 83
view all 8 authors...
Traditional electrochemical measurements based on either current or potential responses only present the average contribution of an entire electrode's surface. Here, we present an electrochemical photothermal reflectance microscope (EPRM) in which a potential-dependent nonlinear photothermal signal is exploited to map an electrochemical process with sub-micron spatial resolution. By using EPRM, we are able to monitor the photothermal signal of a Pt electrode during the electrochemical reaction a...
Source
#1Minghua Zhuge (ZJU: Zhejiang University)H-Index: 1
#1Minghua Zhuge (ZJU: Zhejiang University)H-Index: 1
Last. Ji-Xin Cheng (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 83
view all 11 authors...
High-sensitivity chemical imaging offers a window to decipher the molecular orchestra inside a living system. Based on vibrational fingerprint signatures, coherent Raman scattering microscopy provides a label-free approach to map biomolecules and drug molecules inside a cell. Yet, by near-infrared (NIR) pulse excitation, the sensitivity is limited to millimolar concentration for endogenous biomolecules. Here, the imaging sensitivity of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is significantly boosted f...
1 CitationsSource
#1Jing ZhangH-Index: 1
#2Jian Zhao (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 27
Last. Ji-Xin ChengH-Index: 83
view all 5 authors...
Hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) by spectral focusing can generate label-free chemical images through temporal scanning of chirped femtosecond pulses. Yet, pulse chirping decreases t...
4 CitationsSource
#1Jing ZhangH-Index: 1
#2Haonan Lin (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 6
Last. Ji-Xin Cheng (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 83
view all 5 authors...
High-speed chemical imaging is achieved by combining femtosecond pulse stimulated Raman scattering with deep learning. Speed is improved by ∼60 times with four sub-cellular organelles (lipid droplets, endoplasmic reticulum, nuclei, cytoplasm) classified in MiaPaCa2 cells.
Source
#1Jean-Baptiste Lugagne (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 6
#2Haonan Lin (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 6
Last. Mary J. Dunlop (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 19
view all 3 authors...
Microscopy image analysis is a major bottleneck in quantification of single-cell microscopy data, typically requiring human oversight and curation, which limit both accuracy and throughput. To address this, we developed a deep learning-based image analysis pipeline that performs segmentation, tracking, and lineage reconstruction. Our analysis focuses on time-lapse movies of Escherichia coli cells trapped in a "mother machine" microfluidic device, a scalable platform for long-term single-cell ana...
32 CitationsSource
#1Haonan Lin (BU: Boston University)
#1Haonan Lin (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 6
view all 1 authors...
Fingerprint stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) produces label-free chemical maps of molecules in living systems with higher specificity compared to CH vibration region. However, due to the weak signal levels in the fingerprint window, it remains challenging for fingerprint SRS to study highly dynamic or large-scale samples. Here, we push the design space of SRS using deep learning, which can recover the signal-to-noise ratio to the levels comparable to measurements with 100 times longer integrati...
Source
#1Haonan LinH-Index: 6
#2Hyeon Jeong LeeH-Index: 10
Last. Ji-Xin Cheng (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 83
view all 9 authors...
Label-free vibrational imaging by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) provides unprecedented insight into real-time chemical distributions in living systems. Specifically, SRS in the fingerprint region can resolve multiple chemicals in a complex bio-environment using specific and well-separated Raman signatures. Yet, fingerprint SRS imaging with microsecond spectral acquisition has not been achieved due to the small fingerprint Raman cross-sections and the lack of ultrafast acquisition scheme with...
2 Citations
#1Cheng Zong (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 18
#2Ranjith Premasiri (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 2
Last. Ji-Xin Cheng (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 83
view all 9 authors...
Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy allows for high-speed label-free chemical imaging of biomedical systems. The imaging sensitivity of SRS microscopy is limited to ~10 mM for endogenous biomolecules. Electronic pre-resonant SRS allows detection of sub-micromolar chromophores. However, label-free SRS detection of single biomolecules having extremely small Raman cross-sections (~10−30 cm2 sr−1) remains unreachable. Here, we demonstrate plasmon-enhanced stimulated Raman scattering (PESRS)...
15 CitationsSource