Eunice Y. Chen
Temple University
Vagal tonePsychiatryInternal medicineDevelopmental psychologySurgeryPsychologyCognitionInjury preventionYoung adultAnorexia nervosa (differential diagnoses)Eating disordersDisordered eatingAnorexia nervosaBulimia nervosaBinge-eating disorderDialectical behavior therapyBody mass indexOverweightBorderline personality disorderBinge eatingPoison controlObesityPsychotherapistWeight lossClinical psychologyMedicine
58Publications
22H-index
1,903Citations
Publications 56
Newest
#1Francesca FavieriH-Index: 10
#2Eunice Y. Chen (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 22
Last. Maria CasagrandeH-Index: 23
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Recently, researchers have focused their attention on the role of cognitive processes on eating habits and body weight changes. Few studies have examined the relationship between the first stages of overweight and executive functions (EFs), excluding obesity conditions. This study is aimed to detect the involvement of the EFs and their predictive role on body mass index (BMI) in a sample of healthy individuals from childhood to young adulthood with a cross-sectional design. One-hundred and sixty...
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#1Kara A. Christensen (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
#2Melanie N. French (TU: Temple University)
Last. Eunice Y. Chen (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 22
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OBJECTIVE Eating disorders (EDs) are characterized by dysregulated responses to palatable food. Using a multi-method approach, this study examined responses to palatable food exposure and subsequent ad libitum eating in women with binge-eating disorder (BED: n = 64), anorexia nervosa (AN: n = 16), and bulimia nervosa (BN: n = 35) and 26 healthy controls (HCs). METHOD Participants were exposed to palatable food followed by an ad libitum eating opportunity. Affective and psychophysiological respon...
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#1Eunice Y. Chen (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 22
#2Thomas A. Zeffiro (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 7
Last. Thomas A. Zeffiro (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 8
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Consuming sweet foods, even when sated, can lead to unwanted weight gain. Contextual factors, such as longer time fasting, subjective hunger, and body mass index (BMI), may increase the likelihood of overeating. Nevertheless, the neural mechanisms underlying these moderating influences on energy intake are poorly understood. We conducted both categorical meta-analysis and meta-regression of factors modulating neural responses to sweet stimuli, using data from 30 functional magnetic resonance ima...
5 CitationsSource
#1Eunice Y. Chen (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 22
#2Simon B. Eickhoff (HHU: University of Düsseldorf)H-Index: 113
Last. David V. Smith (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 27
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Abstract Neural models of obesity vary in their focus upon prefrontal and striatal differences. Animal and human studies suggest that differential functioning of the orbitofrontal cortex is associated with obesity. However, meta-analyses of functional neuroimaging studies have not found a clear relationship between the orbitofrontal cortex and obesity. Meta-analyses of structural imaging studies of obesity have shown mixed findings with regards to an association with reduced orbitofrontal cortex...
1 CitationsSource
#1Susan Murray (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 12
#2Eunice Y. Chen (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 22
Animal studies suggest that poor nutrition (e.g., high-fat, high-sugar diets) may lead to impairments in cognitive functioning. Accumulating evidence suggests that the deleterious effects of these diets appear more pronounced in animals maintained on this diet early in life, consistent with the notion that the developing brain may be especially vulnerable to environmental insults. The current paper provides the first systematic review of studies comparing the effects of high-fat, high-sugar diet...
6 CitationsSource
#1Angelina Yiu (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 5
#2Kara A. Christensen (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
Last. Eunice Y. Chen (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 22
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Abstract Background and objectives The tendency to engage in impulsive behaviors when distressed is linked to disordered eating. The current study comprehensively examines emotional responses to a distress tolerance task by utilizing self-report, psychophysiological measures (respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA], skin conductance responses [SCRs] and tonic skin conductance levels [SCLs]), and behavioral measures (i.e., termination of task, latency to quit task). Methods 26 healthy controls (HCs) a...
3 CitationsSource
#1French Mn (TU: Temple University)
#1Melanie French (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 2
Last. Eunice Y. Chen (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 22
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Eating disorders (EDs) are a serious public health concern, affecting about 5.2% of American women. The effects of negative affect on problem-solving and its psychophysiological correlates are poorly understood in this population. This study examined respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and skin conductance responses of 102 women with EDs (Binge eating disorder [BED]: n = 57, Anorexia nervosa: n = 13, Bulimia nervosa [BN]: n = 32) and 24 healthy controls (HCs) at baseline, and then during: a negat...
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#1Stephanie M. Gorka (UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago)H-Index: 22
#2K. Luan Phan (UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago)H-Index: 68
Last. Michael McCloskey (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 64
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Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is an important individual difference factor that may contribute to trait-like aggression. Deficient engagement of the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC) during social situations may also be a mechanism that links these two constructs. The aim of the current study was to test a proposed mediation model whereby IU is associated with trait aggression through neural activation of the vlPFC during a social exclusion task. A total of 53 adults with a range of impu...
5 CitationsSource
#1Eunice Y. Chen (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 22
#2Susan Murray (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 12
Last. David V. Smith (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 27
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Meta-analyses of neuroimaging studies have not found a clear relationship between the orbitofrontal cortex and obesity, despite animal and human studies suggesting the contrary. Our primary meta-analysis examined what regions are associated with reduced gray matter volume, given increased body mass index. We identified 23 voxel-based morphometry studies examining the association between gray matter volume and body mass index. In a sample of 6,788 participants, we found that greater body mass ind...
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#1Eunice Y. Chen (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 22
#2Walter H. Kaye (USD: University of San Diego)H-Index: 113
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