Julian Givi
West Virginia University
ScarcityPositive economicsSelection (linguistics)FeelingHeuristicsVariety (cybernetics)SociologyBusinessDancePsychologyProsocial behaviorActuarial scienceEconomicsMarketingSelfWork (electrical)Social comparison theoryAnchoringPosition (finance)Value (mathematics)Value (ethics)Status quoLead (geology)HappinessVariety seekingQuality (business)Best interestsGiftgivingSingle pointSpecial eventsPractical implicationsGift givingFocus (computing)Process (engineering)NormativeDeed of giftProbabilistic logicResource (project management)Term (time)Keeping up with the JonesesSocial psychologyIncentive compatibility
16Publications
4H-index
54Citations
Publications 14
Newest
#1Julian Givi (WVU: West Virginia University)H-Index: 4
Abstract When a gift is given from a giver to a recipient, there is often an expectation that the recipient will reciprocate, for example, during the winter holidays. However, recipients do not always have gifts to return to their givers for such “reciprocatory occasions.” They might be unaware beforehand, for instance, that the giver will be giving them one. This research examines whether givers accurately assess how uncomfortable recipients feel when they fail to reciprocate a giver’s gift for...
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#1Julian Givi (WVU: West Virginia University)H-Index: 4
#2Jeff Galak (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 21
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#1Julian Givi (WVU: West Virginia University)H-Index: 4
#2Jeff Galak (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 21
Last. Christopher Y. Olivola (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 19
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Gift-recipients typically receive multiple gifts in the same sitting, yet little is known about the impact of other gifts on givers’ and recipients’ evaluations of any one gift. Across 12 studies, we demonstrate that givers overestimate how much a recipient’s liking of their (i.e., the giver’s) gift [increases/decreases] when it compares [favorably/unfavorably] to other gifts. This appears to be driven by givers not appreciating that, for recipients, it is the thought that counts. Howev...
3 CitationsSource
AbstractThe present work examines consumers’ sequence ordering preferences when they have multiple probabilistic opportunities to obtain a resource. In particular, this research investigates whethe...
1 CitationsSource
#1Julian Givi (WVU: West Virginia University)H-Index: 4
Abstract Much of the time when a gift giver is selecting a gift, the recipient is someone whom the giver has given a gift to previously. The present work explores how givers’ decision-making and recipients’ desires are influenced by prior gifts given from giver to recipient; in particular, this research examines whether givers and recipients agree when it comes to the decision of whether to repeat a gift that the giver previously gave to the recipient (a “repeat” gift), or opt for a different gi...
3 CitationsSource
AbstractPerhaps the most common form of prosocial behavior that consumers engage in is gift giving. In doing so, consumers presumably act in the best interests of recipients, by giving gifts that they believe recipients will cherish. That said, the results of five lab and field studies demonstrate that consumers sometimes do the opposite: they give gifts they do not believe to be best. Specifically, the present work shows that gift givers desire to feel unique and thus refrain from giving gifts ...
5 CitationsSource
#1Julian GiviH-Index: 4
In this research, I introduce a novel framework for understanding and predicting asymmetries in gift giving (i.e., disparities between the types of gifts givers give and the onesrecipients prefer to receive). This framework is centered around descriptive and injunctive normsand is capable of both accounting for previously documented giver-recipient asymmetries and predicting novel ones. Specifically, I demonstrate that gift giving asymmetries are most likely to occur when one of the gifts being ...
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#1Julian Givi (WVU: West Virginia University)H-Index: 4
#2Jeff Galak (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 21
In the present research, we document a novel forecasting bias, which we term the “future is now” (FIN) bias. Specifically, we show that people tend to believe that the future will mirror the present, even when such a belief is unfounded. That is, people overestimate the chances that whatever is happening now, will happen in the future, even when the (known) explicit probabilities of future outcomes contradict such a belief. This appears to be driven by an anchoring and (insufficient) adjustment ...
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#1Julian Givi (WVU: West Virginia University)H-Index: 4
#2Jeff Galak (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 21
Abstract Past research in gift giving has largely treated asymmetries between the types of gifts givers give and the ones recipients prefer to receive as unintentional errors on the part of givers. In contrast, we show that givers sometimes intentionally bypass gifts that they know will bring the most joy and happiness to their recipients. Specifically, we demonstrate that givers dislike giving gifts that compare favorably to their own possessions, because they feel that doing so would lead them...
5 CitationsSource
#1Julian Givi (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 4
#2Jeff Galak (CMU: Carnegie Mellon University)H-Index: 21
Abstract Sentimental value is the value derived from an emotionally-laden item's associations with significant others, or special events or times in one's life. The present research demonstrates that when faced with the choice between sentimentally valuable gifts and gifts with superficial attributes that match the preferences of the recipient, givers give the latter much more often than recipients would prefer to receive such gifts. This asymmetry appears to be driven by givers feeling relative...
13 CitationsSource