Kris Sales
University of East Anglia
OffspringReproductive successEctothermTransgenerational epigeneticsSterilityInsectCaenorhabditis elegansFlour beetleSpermPopulationFitness effectsHealthy ageingMatingFertilityGeneticsReproductionBiologyZoologyCompetition (biology)Cell biology
11Publications
5H-index
110Citations
Publications 11
Newest
#1Hanne Carlsson (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 1
#2Edward Ivimey-Cook (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 1
Last. Alexei A. Maklakov (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 35
view all 6 authors...
Source
#1Ramakrishnan Vasudeva (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 6
#2Matthew E. Dickinson (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 4
Last. Matthew J. G. Gage (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 41
view all 6 authors...
Why is polyandry such a common mating behaviour when it exposes females to a range of significant fitness costs? Here, we investigated whether polyandry protects females against reduced male fertility caused by thermal stress from heatwave conditions. Sperm production and function are vulnerable to heat, and heatwave conditions are forecast to increase as our climate warms, so we examined these effects on female reproduction and mating behaviour in the flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, a promis...
1 CitationsSource
#1Kris Sales (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 5
#2Ramakrishnan Vasudeva (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 6
Last. Matthew J. G. Gage (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 41
view all 3 authors...
With climate change creating a more volatile atmosphere, heatwaves that create thermal stress for living systems will become stronger and more frequent. Using the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, ...
3 CitationsSource
#1Elizabeth M. L. Duxbury (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 3
#2Hanne Carlsson (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 1
Last. Alexei A. Maklakov (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 35
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Dominant theory maintains that organisms age due to resource allocation trade-offs between the immortal germline and the disposable soma. Strikingly, adulthood-only downregulation of insulin signalling, an evolutionarily conserved pathway regulating resource allocation between reproduction and soma, increases lifespan and offspring fitness without fecundity cost in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. Nevertheless, theory suggests that reduced germline maintenance can be a hidden cost ...
Source
#1Edward Ivimey-Cook (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 1
#2Kris Sales (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 5
Last. Alexei A. Maklakov (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 35
view all 6 authors...
Dietary restriction increases lifespan in a broad variety of organisms and improves health in humans. However, long-term transgenerational consequences of dietary interventions are poorly understood. Here we investigated the effect of dietary restriction by temporary fasting (TF) on mortality risk, age-specific reproduction and fitness across three generations of descendants in C. elegans. We show that while TF robustly reduces mortality risk and improves late-life reproduction in the parental g...
2 CitationsSource
#1Ramakrishnan Vasudeva (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 6
#2Andreas Sutter (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 9
Last. Matthew J. G. Gage (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 41
view all 6 authors...
Rising and more variable global temperatures pose a challenge for biodiversity, with reproduction and fertility being especially sensitive to heat. Here, we assessed the potential for thermal adaptation in sperm and egg function using Tribolium flour beetles, a warm-temperate-tropical insect model. Following temperature increases through adult development, we found opposing gamete responses, with males producing shorter sperm and females laying larger eggs. Importantly, this gamete phenotypic pl...
7 CitationsSource
#1Ramakrishnan Vasudeva (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 6
#2Andreas Sutter (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 9
Last. Matthew J. G. Gage (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 41
view all 6 authors...
Source
#1Kris Sales (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 5
#2Ramakrishnan Vasudeva (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 6
Last. Matthew J. G. Gage (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 41
view all 10 authors...
Climate change is affecting biodiversity, but proximate drivers remain poorly understood. Here, we examine how experimental heatwaves impact on reproduction in an insect system. Male sensitivity to heat is recognised in endotherms, but ectotherms have received limited attention, despite comprising most of biodiversity and being more influenced by temperature variation. Using a flour beetle model system, we find that heatwave conditions (5 to 7 °C above optimum for 5 days) damaged male, but not f...
71 CitationsSource
#1D. S. Murray (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 5
#2Martin J. KainzH-Index: 33
Last. Matthew J. G. Gage (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 41
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Triploidy could prevent escaped farm salmon breeding in the wild, while also improving nutrient quality within farmed fillets. Despite these potential advantages, triploid Atlantic salmon have not been widely used in aquaculture, and their reproductive function has yet to be fully evaluated. Here, we compare reproductive function and fillet composition between triploid and diploid farm salmon under standard aquaculture rearing conditions. We show that female triploids are sterile and do not deve...
11 CitationsSource
#1Kris Sales (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 5
#2Thomas Trent (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 1
Last. Matthew J. G. Gage (UEA: University of East Anglia)H-Index: 41
view all 8 authors...
The existence of widespread male same-sex sexual behaviour (SSB) is puzzling: why does evolution allow costly homosexual activity to exist, when reproductive fitness is primarily achieved through heterosexual matings? Here, we used experimental evolution to understand why SSB occurs in the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. By varying the adult operational sex ratio across 82–106 generations, we created divergent evolutionary regimes that selected for or against SSB depending upon its function. M...
14 CitationsSource