Anne Cecilie Sjøli Bråthen
University of Oslo
RecallSleep in non-human animalsHOMER1Internal medicineEndocrinologyDevelopmental psychologyMagnetic resonance imagingHippocampal formationDiffusion MRIGene expressionPsychologyHeritabilityNeuroscienceCognitionCognitive psychologyPerspective (graphical)Young adultTraining (meteorology)Cortex (anatomy)Human brainSuperior longitudinal fasciculusLongitudinal studyCorpus callosumSleep deprivationMemory improvementDiseaseSession (web analytics)Cognitive trainingLonelinessPremisesTemporal lobeHippocampusWhite matterContinuous trainingMemory trainingCognitive declineCognitive changeHippocampal volumeAmyloid depositionVerbal learningDelayed recallInitial trainingFree recallAffect (psychology)NeuroplasticityGeriatricsAudiologyMedicineBiomarker (medicine)PlasticityEpisodic memoryAmyloidFractional anisotropy
8Publications
6H-index
107Citations
Publications 8
Newest
#1Bråthen Acs. (University of Oslo)H-Index: 1
#1Anne Cecilie Sjøli Bråthen (University of Oslo)H-Index: 6
Last. Kristine B. Walhovd (University of Oslo)H-Index: 75
view all 4 authors...
Risk and protective factors for cognitive function in aging may affect how much individuals benefit from their environment or life experiences by preserving or improving cognitive abilities. We inv...
1 CitationsSource
#1Kristine B. Walhovd (University of Oslo)H-Index: 75
#2Anne Cecilie Sjøli Bråthen (University of Oslo)H-Index: 6
Last. Anders M. Fjell (University of Oslo)H-Index: 76
view all 11 authors...
Memory performance results from plasticity, the ability to change with experience. We show that benefit from practice over a few trials, learning slope, is predictive of long-term recall and hippocampal volume across a broad age range and a long period of time, relates to memory training benefit, and is heritable. First, in a healthy lifespan sample (n = 1825, age 4-93 years), comprising 3483 occasions of combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and memory tests over a period of up to 11 ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Anders M. Fjell (University of Oslo)H-Index: 76
#2Donatas Sederevicius (University of Oslo)H-Index: 7
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Sleep problems are related to the elevated levels of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarker beta-amyloid (Abeta). Hypotheses about the causes of this relationship can be generated from molecular markers of sleep problems identified in rodents. A major marker of sleep deprivation is Homer1a, a neural protein coded by the HOMER1 gene, which has also been implicated in brain Abeta accumulation. Here, we tested whether the relationship between cortical Abeta accumulation and self-reported sleep qual...
4 CitationsSource
#1Anne Cecilie Sjøli Bråthen (University of Oslo)H-Index: 6
#2Ann-Marie Glasø de Lange (University of Oslo)H-Index: 10
Last. Kristine B. Walhovd (University of Oslo)H-Index: 75
view all 6 authors...
: Episodic memory can be trained in both early and late adulthood, but there is considerable variation in cognitive improvement across individuals. Which brain characteristics make some individuals benefit more than others? We used a multimodal approach to investigate whether volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and resting-state functional MRI characteristics of the cortex and hippocampus, brain regions involved in episodic-memory function, were predictive of cognitive improvement after ...
5 CitationsSource
#1Ann-Marie Glasø de Lange (University of Oslo)H-Index: 10
#2Anne Cecilie Sjøli Bråthen (University of Oslo)H-Index: 6
Last. Kristine B. Walhovd (University of Oslo)H-Index: 75
view all 5 authors...
: Cognitive training has been suggested as a possible remediation of decline in brain structure with older age. However, it is unknown whether training effects are transient or enduring, as no studies have examined training-induced plasticity relative to decline in older adults across extended periods with multiple intervention phases. We investigated the temporal dynamics of brain plasticity across periods on and off memory training, hypothesizing that (1) a decline in white matter (WM) microst...
12 CitationsSource
#1Ann-Marie Glasø de Lange (University of Oslo)H-Index: 10
#2Anne Cecilie Sjøli Bråthen (University of Oslo)H-Index: 6
Last. Kristine B. Walhovd (University of Oslo)H-Index: 75
view all 6 authors...
Age differences in human brain plasticity are assumed, but have not been systematically investigated. In this longitudinal study, we investigated changes in white matter (WM) microstructure in response to memory training relative to passive and active control conditions in 183 young and older adults. We hypothesized that (i) only the training group would show improved memory performance and microstructural alterations, (ii) the young adults would show larger memory improvement and a higher degre...
30 CitationsSource
#1Ann-Marie Glasø de Lange (University of Oslo)H-Index: 10
#2Anne Cecilie Sjøli Bråthen (University of Oslo)H-Index: 6
Last. Kristine B. Walhovd (University of Oslo)H-Index: 75
view all 10 authors...
Age-related differences in white matter (WM) integrity are substantial, but it is unknown whether between subject variability in WM integrity influences the capacity for cognitive improvement. We i ...
39 CitationsSource
#1Kristine B. Walhovd (University of Oslo)H-Index: 75
#2René Westerhausen (University of Oslo)H-Index: 39
Last. Anders M. Fjell (University of Oslo)H-Index: 76
view all 7 authors...
In this perspective paper, we examine possible premises of plasticity in the neural substrates underlying cognitive change. We take the special role of the medial temporal lobe as an anchoring point, but also investigate characteristics throughout the cortex. Specifically, we examine the dimensions of evolutionary expansion, heritability, variability of morphometric change, and inter-individual variance in myelination with respect to the plastic potential of different brain regions. We argue tha...
13 CitationsSource