Ramesh Kumar Mishra
University of Hyderabad
Eye movementPsychologyCognitionCognitive psychologyCognitive sciencePerceptionControl (linguistics)SentenceLanguage proficiencySaccadeContext (language use)Task (project management)LinguisticsCommunicationNeuroscience of multilingualismComprehensionHindiLiteracyReading (process)Eye trackingPsycholinguistics
101Publications
16H-index
797Citations
Publications 100
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#1Alexis Hervais-Adelman (UZH: University of Zurich)H-Index: 18
Last. Falk Huettig (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 28
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Previous research suggest that literacy, specifically learning alphabetic letter-to-phoneme mappings, modifies online speech processing, and enhances brain responses to speech in auditory areas associated with phonological processing (Dehaene et al., 2010). However, alphabets are not the only orthographic systems in use in the world, and hundreds of millions of individuals speak languages that are not written using alphabets. In order to make claims that literacy per se has broad and general con...
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#1Seema Prasad (University of Hyderabad)H-Index: 5
#2Ramesh Kumar Mishra (University of Hyderabad)H-Index: 16
Last. Raymond M. Klein (Dal: Dalhousie University)H-Index: 70
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In 2018, Ruthruff and Gaspelin used a modified spatial cuing paradigm in which targets were presented at two locations while abrupt-onset cues could be presented at four locations. They found that performance following cues presented at irrelevant locations was no worse than following no cue or following a centrally presented cue. They concluded, as conveyed by the title of their article (Immunity to Attentional Capture at Ignored Locations) that a spatial attentional control setting had elimina...
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#1Aniruddha Ramgir (TAU: Tel Aviv University)
#2Seema Prasad (University of Hyderabad)H-Index: 5
Last. Ramesh Kumar Mishra (University of Hyderabad)H-Index: 16
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Salient objects, such as abrupt-onsets, can capture attention even when nearly invisible. While the influence of explicit factors on such capture (e.g., task-goals) has been extensively investigate...
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Does a concurrent verbal working memory (WM) load constrain cross-linguistic activation? In a visual world study, participants listened to Hindi (L1) or English (L2) spoken words and viewed a display containing the phonological cohort of the translation equivalent (TE cohort) of the spoken word and 3 distractors. Experiment 1 was administered without a load. Participants then maintained two or four letters (Experiment 2) or two, six or eight letters (Experiment 3) in WM and were tested on backwa...
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1 CitationsSource
#1Riya Rafeekh (University of Hyderabad)
#2P. Phani Krishna (University of Hyderabad)
Last. Ramesh Kumar Mishra (University of Hyderabad)H-Index: 16
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This study investigated whether a short training (8 weeks) in the second-language (English) has any facilitative effect on components of executive functions in young adults. A pre-post design was used with two groups of participants: one group (experimental group) of students received English language training for eight weeks, and another group (control group) matched on age and background did not. Executive function tasks (Flanker, Stroop, and color-shape switching task) along with the object n...
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#1Seema Prasad (University of Hyderabad)H-Index: 5
#2Shiji Viswambharan (University of Hyderabad)H-Index: 1
Last. Ramesh Kumar Mishra (University of Hyderabad)H-Index: 16
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Abstract Visual world studies with bilinguals have demonstrated spontaneous cross-linguistic activations. In two experiments, we examined whether concurrent visual working memory (VWM) load constrains bilingual parallel activation during spoken word comprehension. Hindi-English bilinguals heard a spoken word in Hindi (L1) or English (L2) and saw a display containing the spoken word-referent, a phonological cohort of the spoken word’s translation and two unrelated objects. Participants completed ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Seema Prasad (University of Hyderabad)H-Index: 5
#2Ramesh Kumar Mishra (University of Hyderabad)H-Index: 16
While it is known that reward induces attentional prioritisation, it is not clear what effect reward-learning has when associated with stimuli that are not fully perceived. The masked priming paradigm has been extensively used to investigate the indirect impact of brief stimuli on response behaviour. Interestingly, the effect of masked primes is observed even when participants choose their responses freely. While classical theories assume this process to be automatic, recent studies have provide...
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Previous studies have shown that, under specific conditions, arrays that have been pointed at encoding are recognized better than passively viewed ones. According to one interpretation, the superior recognition of pointed-to arrays can be explained by the motor inhibition of passively viewed arrays. The present study sought to determine whether a similar motor inhibition can be induced also when the participants observed a co-actor perform the pointing movements. Participants were presented with...
1 CitationsSource