Lalin Anik
University of Virginia
AdvertisingSelection (linguistics)FeelingSocial influenceSociologyBusinessPsychologyProsocial behaviorEconomicsMarketingMatching (statistics)Political scienceConsumer behaviourWell-beingScale (ratio)HappinessIncentiveFear of missing outComputer scienceSocial mediaBrand managementTipping point (climatology)Social psychologyAggregate behaviorModeration
24Publications
6H-index
182Citations
Publications 22
Newest
#2Lalin AnikH-Index: 6
Last. Luca Cian (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 8
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In efforts to keep ill-behaving consumers in check, managers are increasingly implementing the practice of rating consumers. We develop and test an account of when and why the practice of rating consumers backfires. Study 1 shows that consumers are more likely to misbehave toward service providers after receiving a low rating (versus those who receive a high rating or those who are merely aware that they are being rated). These findings are robust to consumer inexperience. The negative impact of...
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The majority of research on the fear of missing out (FOMO) has focused on understanding how social media posts about attractive unattended experiences taking place in the physical world (e.g., a friend’s vacation) influence individuals’ affective states. With quarantine measures in place, and in the absence of travel and party photos on social media, do individuals feel they are missing out on enjoyable experiences? The current work shows that FOMO has not disappeared during the pandemic, even w...
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#1David DuboisH-Index: 15
#1David L. DuBoisH-Index: 38
Last. Lalin AnikH-Index: 6
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This work examines the interplay between power, status and style. Building on the dual role of power and status as two primary sources of social influence in contemporary consumer society, we propose that stylistic choices associated with greater status can imbue the wearer with greater feelings of power. We focus on a pervasive stylistic choice for women – whether to wear heels – and test two critical relationships regarding consumers' choice of heels that can act as a bridge between status and...
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#1Lalin Anik (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 6
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This case uses Supreme, a skater-clothing brand from New York City, and a framework for understanding the concept of “coolness” (see "A General Theory of Coolness," UVA-M-0953), which is the cornerstone of the firm's success, to set the stage for analyzing consumer behavior. Written using public sources, the case discusses the firm's overall strategy, including limited supply, unique shopping drops for newly released items, and a fan-like customer base. It introduces “coolness” as a marketing te...
#1Ceren Hayran (Özyeğin University)H-Index: 4
#2Lalin Anik (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 6
Last. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli (Koç University)H-Index: 18
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We investigate a popular but underresearched concept, the fear of missing out (FOMO), on desirable experiences of which an individual is aware, but in which they do not partake. Through laboratory and field studies, we establish FOMO's pervasiveness as a psychological phenomenon, present real-life contexts wherein FOMO may be experienced, and explore its behavioral consequences. Specifically, we show that FOMO poses a threat to loyalty by decreasing one's intentions to repeat a current experienc...
5 CitationsSource
AbstractWe document the impact of making a consumer the tipping point whose behavior causes some aggregate behavior to tip over a social threshold, increasing the impact of all others who have already engaged in a target behavior. In study 1, consumers were more likely to agree to get a blood screening when they were the tipping point who caused an incentive to exceed a threshold. Study 2 shows that being the tipping point can be more effective in changing behavior than equivalent-in-value incen...
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#1Lalin Anik (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 6
#2Ryan Hauser (Yale University)H-Index: 1
Abstract Individuals prefer romantic partners who universally treat others well (i.e., partners who exhibit trait-level generosity) and also prefer partners who treat them uniquely. Previous work supports both preferences, yet the literature has largely ignored what happens when these preferences conflict. In the present work, we compare these two preferences in romantic relationships by pitting people's preference for trait-level generosity from their partner against their preference for unique...
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#1Ximena Garcia-Rada (Harvard University)H-Index: 6
#2Lalin Anik (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 6
Last. Dan Ariely (Duke University)H-Index: 95
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Across three studies, we investigate how consumers in romantic relationships make decisions when choosing an item to share with their partner. We show that consumers will forgo their preferred alternative for an option that is more aligned with the preferences of their partner when consuming the same item together vs. separately. We theorize and show that when consuming together (vs. separately), consumers’ purchase motivation shifts from being utilitarian (e.g., satisfying one’s hunger) to hedo...
5 CitationsSource
#1Lalin Anik (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 6
#2Johnny Miles (UVA: University of Virginia)
Last. Ryan HauserH-Index: 1
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Coolness is a quality that is widely desired but not widely understood. While many brands seek to establish themselves as “cool,” few have a clear idea of how to get there. In this technical note, we present a general framework for coolness that can be used by consumers and managers alike to better understand how to create an air of cool around themselves, their brand, or their products.Our framework rests on four traits: autonomy, authenticity, attitude, and association, and on the interplay be...
The producers of the newest James Bond film, Spectre, had a difficult sponsorship decision to make before filming of the movie began in one month. Up for consideration was a highly lucrative product promotion with Heineken, which offered both a sizable contribution to the film as well as a high-budget advertising campaign. The studio was looking for any way it could to reduce the cost of the film (which was nearing $250 million), but the producers were concerned about the negative backlash they ...