Robert S. Erikson
Columbia University
Positive economicsErikson's stages of psychosocial developmentPublic opinionPolitical economyEconometricsIdeologyEconomicsMacroPolitical sciencePresidential systemLawEconomic indicatorPresidential electionState (polity)PolityPublic administrationPublic relationsVotingDemocracyPolitics
157Publications
49H-index
8,293Citations
Publications 145
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#1Robert S. EriksonH-Index: 49
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#1Christopher Wlezien (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 45
#2Will Jennings (University of Southampton)H-Index: 29
Last. Robert S. Erikson (Columbia University)H-Index: 49
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To study the evolution of electoral preferences, Erikson and Wlezien (2012) propose assessing the correspondence between pre-election polls and the vote in a set of elections. That is, they treat poll data not as a set of time series but as a series of cross-sections—across elections—for each day of the election cycle. This “timeline” method does not provide complete information, but does reveal general patterns of electoral dynamics, and has been applied to elections in numerous countries. The ...
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#1Robert S. Erikson (Columbia University)H-Index: 49
#2Kelly Rader (Yale University)H-Index: 7
An influential paper by Caughey and Sekhon ( 2011a ) suggests that the outcomes of very close US House elections in the postwar era may not be as-if random, thus calling into question this application of regression discontinuity for causal inference. We show that while incumbent party candidates are more likely to win close House elections, those who win are no different on observable characteristics from those who lose. Further, all differences in observable characteristics between barely winni...
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#1James E. Campbell (UB: University at Buffalo)H-Index: 26
#2Helmut Norpoth (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 28
Last. Alfred G. Cuzán (UWF: University of West Florida)H-Index: 11
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#1Robert S. EriksonH-Index: 49
#2Alan S. GerberH-Index: 59
Last. Eric SchicklerH-Index: 22
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#1Robert S. Erikson (Columbia University)H-Index: 49
#2Christopher Wlezien (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 45
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This article analyzes voting for Congress in presidential election years. The national Democratic vote for the House increases with the Democratic vote for president but decreases with the Democrats' perceived chances of winning the presidency (anticipatory balancing). The evidence for coattails and for balancing become visible only when statistically controlling for the other. The aggregate evidence for coattails and balancing in presidential years is reinforced by the analysis of National Elec...
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#1Yosef BhattiH-Index: 15
#2Robert S. EriksonH-Index: 49
In his new book Unequal Democracy, Larry Bartels finds that rich constituents are substantially better represented by the legislators in the US Senate than their poorer counterparts. In fact, the poorest third of the population is not represented at all. While we do not find evidence directly contradictory this finding, we add some complications. First, we solve a methodological problem caused by the fact that the weights used in the existing literature render the results scale variant. Second, ...
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