Lisa M. Bates
Columbia University
Social classPsychiatryMental healthEthnic groupPublic healthOddsSociologySocioeconomic statusDemographyPsychologyInjury preventionCohort studyPsychological interventionDepression (differential diagnoses)Context (language use)Major depressive disorderPopulationPerinatal DepressionPoison controlSuicide preventionDomestic violenceImmigrationClinical psychologyMedicineGerontology
76Publications
25H-index
2,084Citations
Publications 76
Newest
#1Sarah McKetta (Columbia University)H-Index: 6
#2Seth J. Prins (Columbia University)H-Index: 12
Last. Katherine M. Keyes (Columbia University)H-Index: 85
view all 5 authors...
Abstract null null Background null Rates of binge drinking have nearly doubled among US women ages 30-49 since 2006. Employment influences alcohol use and varies by the prestige and structure (e.g., authority, autonomy, expertise) of one's occupation. null null null Methods null We examined trends in binge drinking among adults ages 30-49 in the labor force in 2006-2018 National Health Interview Surveys (N=108,981) by occupation, work prestige (General Social Survey's occupational prestige score...
1 CitationsSource
#1John R. Pamplin (Columbia University)H-Index: 2
#2Katrina Kezios (Columbia University)H-Index: 6
Last. Lisa M. Bates (Columbia University)H-Index: 25
view all 8 authors...
Source
#1Jonathan Platt (Columbia University)H-Index: 13
#2Lisa M. Bates (Columbia University)H-Index: 25
Last. Katherine M. Keyes (Columbia University)H-Index: 85
view all 5 authors...
The depression gap refers to higher rates of depression among women than men. Change in the depression gap over time may elucidate social causes of this disparity-such as unequal college attendance or employment status. We conducted a meta-regression analysis to estimate variation in the depression gap over time by age, accounting for potential sources of variation between studies. Electronic databases and bibliographies were searched for English language studies from January 1980-October 2019. ...
1 CitationsSource
Abstract null null The Black-white Depression paradox, the lower prevalence of major depression among non-Hispanic Black (relative to non-Hispanic white) individuals despite their greater exposure to major life stressors, is a phenomenon that remains unexplained. Despite a decade plus of research, there is little clarity as to whether the paradoxical observations are an invalid finding, spuriously produced by selection bias, information bias, or confounding, or are a valid finding, representativ...
2 CitationsSource
#1Laura W Stoff (UMN: University of Minnesota)
#2Lisa M. Bates (Columbia University)H-Index: 25
Last. Theresa L. Osypuk (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 30
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BACKGROUND Intimate partner violence (IPV) is high among married women in Bangladesh. Social isolation is a well-established correlate of women's exposure to IPV, but the role of such factors in low-income and middle-income countries is not well understood. In this study, we explore whether social connection is protective against IPV among married women in rural Bangladesh. METHODS Data were drawn from a multistage, stratified, population-based longitudinal sample of 3355 married women in rural ...
Source
#1John R. Pamplin (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 2
#2Katrina Kezios (Columbia University)H-Index: 6
Last. Lisa M. Bates (Columbia University)H-Index: 25
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Abstract The Environmental Affordances (EA) model posits that Black Americans’ engagement with unhealthy behaviors (i.e. smoking, alcohol use, eating calorie-dense foods) to cope with stressor exposure may simultaneously account for their observed greater risk of chronic physical illness, and their observed equal or lesser prevalence of depression, relative to white Americans – the so-called “Black-white depression paradox.” However, the specific mechanisms through which such effects might arise...
2 CitationsSource
#1Ashley HagamanH-Index: 12
#2Katherine LeMasters (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 6
Last. Joanna Maselko (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 22
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BACKGROUND Depression in the perinatal period, during pregnancy or within 1 year of childbirth, imposes a high burden on women with rippling effects through her and her child's life course. Social support may be an important protective factor, but the complex bidirectional relationship with depression, alongside a paucity of longitudinal explorations, leaves much unknown about critical windows of social support exposure across the perinatal period and causal impacts on future depressive episodes...
1 CitationsSource
#1Deepika Dilip (Columbia University)
#2Lisa M. Bates (Columbia University)H-Index: 25
Sexual violence is a prevalent public health issue among college students and associated with adverse mental health outcomes. Modern social movements that bring awareness to sexual violence, such a...
Source
#1Precious Esie (Columbia University)H-Index: 2
#2Theresa L. Osypuk (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 30
Last. Lisa M. Bates (Columbia University)H-Index: 25
view all 4 authors...
BACKGROUND Intimate partner violence (IPV) is highly prevalent globally and associated with adverse mental health outcomes among women. In IPV-endemic contexts like Bangladesh, previous research has found no association between low levels of IPV and depression. Although IPV and attitudes justifying IPV against women are highly prevalent in this context, nothing is known about how related contextual norms affect associations between individual-level IPV exposure and depression. The present study ...
Source
#1Seth J. Prins (Columbia University)H-Index: 12
#2Sarah McKettaH-Index: 6
Last. Lisa M. BatesH-Index: 25
view all 6 authors...
BACKGROUND Social stratification is a well-documented determinant of mental health. Traditional measures of stratification (e.g., socioeconomic status) reduce dynamic social processes to individual attributes downstream of mechanisms that generate stratification. In this study, we measure one process theorized to generate and reproduce social stratification-economic exploitation-and explore its association with mental health. METHODS Data are from the 1983 to 2017 waves of the Panel Study of Inc...
2 CitationsSource