Michelle Hurst
University of Chicago
Fraction (mathematics)Magnitude (astronomy)Developmental psychologyArtificial intelligencePsychologyCognitionCognitive psychologyNatural language processingPie chartRelation (database)Proportional reasoningFluencyPsycINFOContext (language use)Task (project management)Math educationMathematicsNotationRational numberDecimalNumber lineArithmetic
26Publications
5H-index
116Citations
Publications 23
Newest
#1Michelle Hurst (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 5
#2Alyson Wong (BC: Boston College)
Last. Sara Cordes (BC: Boston College)H-Index: 20
view all 5 authors...
Abstract null null Children struggle with proportional reasoning when discrete countable information is available because they over-rely on this numerical information even when it leads to errors. In the current study, we investigated whether different types of gesture can exacerbate or mitigate these errors. Children aged 5–7 years (N = 135) were introduced to equivalent proportions using discrete gestures that highlighted separate parts, continuous gestures that highlighted continuous amounts,...
Source
#1David W. Braithwaite (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 7
#2Jake McMullen (UTU: University of Turku)H-Index: 13
Last. Michelle Hurst (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 5
view all 0 authors...
Understanding fractions and decimals requires not only understanding each notation separately, or within-notation knowledge, but also understanding relations between notations, or cross-notation knowledge. Multiple notations pose a challenge for learners but could also present an opportunity, in that cross-notation knowledge could help learners to achieve a better understanding of rational numbers than could easily be achieved from within-notation knowledge alone. This hypothesis was tested by r...
1 CitationsSource
#1Michelle Hurst (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 5
#2Alex Shaw (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 21
Last. Susan C. Levine (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 63
view all 4 authors...
Young children show remarkably sophisticated abilities to evaluate others. Yet their abilities to engage in proportional moral evaluation undergoes protracted development. Namely, young children evaluate someone who shares absolutely more as being "nicer" than someone who shares proportionally more (e.g., sharing 3-out-of-6 is nicer than sharing 2-out-of-3, because 3 > 2, even though 3/6 < 2/3), whereas adults think the opposite. We investigate the hypothesis that this prior work underestimates ...
Source
#1Michelle HurstH-Index: 5
Last. Sara CordesH-Index: 20
view all 3 authors...
Fraction notation conveys both part-whole (3/4 is 3 out of 4) and magnitude (3/4 = 0.75) information, yet evidence suggests that both children and adults find accessing magnitude information from fractions particularly difficult. Recent research suggests that using number lines to teach children about fractions can help emphasize fraction magnitude. In three experiments with adults and 9-12-year-old children, we compare the benefits of number lines and pie charts for thinking about rational numb...
Source
#1Sophie SavelkoulsH-Index: 3
#2Michelle HurstH-Index: 5
Last. Sara CordesH-Index: 20
view all 3 authors...
Much research has examined the reciprocal relations between a child's spontaneous focus on number (SFON) in the preschool years and later mathematical achievement. However, this literature relies on several different tasks to assess SFON with distinct task demands, making it unclear to what extent these tasks measure the same underlying construct. Moreover, prior studies have investigated SFON in the context of small sets exclusively, but no work has explored whether children demonstrate SFON fo...
Source
#1Michelle HurstH-Index: 5
#2Stephanie DenisonH-Index: 12
Last. Jessica F. CantlonH-Index: 27
view all 5 authors...
#1Michelle HurstH-Index: 5
Last. Susan C. LevineH-Index: 63
view all 3 authors...
#1Michelle HurstH-Index: 5
Last. Sara CordesH-Index: 20
view all 3 authors...
Source
#1Michelle Hurst (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 5
#2Naomi Polinsky (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 2
Last. David H. Uttal (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 37
view all 5 authors...
3 CitationsSource
#1Michelle HurstH-Index: 5
#2Ty W. BoyerH-Index: 13
Last. Sara CordesH-Index: 20
view all 3 authors...
Source