Russell J. Webster
Pennsylvania State University
Prejudice (legal term)Statistical physicsDevelopmental psychologyAttributionMathematics educationPsychologyProsocial behaviorMoral evilTechnical reportPerceptionSocial dominance orientationSuperstitionHarmScale (ratio)Right-wing authoritarianismAggressionMortality saliencePersuasionGun violenceResistance (psychoanalysis)Environmental scienceComputer scienceKnowledge managementSocial psychology
35Publications
10H-index
186Citations
Publications 32
Newest
#1Russell J. Webster (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 10
#2Nicolette (Lynn) Morrone (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 1
Last. Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 21
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Even if businesses try to be ethical, they can succeed only if there are ethically-minded consumers. Three studies using college (N = 199) and nationwide (Ns = 345 and 327) convenience samples examined the effects of belief in pure evil (BPE) and belief in pure good (BPG) on consumer ethics attitudes and behavior, after controlling for demographic variables and various moral attitude scales. Across S1 and S2, BPG uniquely predicted greater endorsement of more prosocial consumer actions ...
Source
#1Russell J. Webster (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 10
#2Dominic Vasturia (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 2
Last. Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 21
view all 3 authors...
Source
Abstract People differ greatly in their beliefs in pure good (BPG) and beliefs in pure evil (BPE), but little is known about how people develop such beliefs. In two studies using nationwide convenience samples (Ns = 384 and 345), we used trait (Big 5; HEXACO) and moral (moral foundations theory; Kohlberg's theory of moral development) theories to uncover potential underpinnings of BPG and BPE. After controlling for demographics and ideology, traits (Agreeableness) and moral foundations (Care/Har...
Source
#1Dominic Vasturia (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 2
#2Russell J. Webster (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 10
Last. Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 21
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Mass shootings have received widespread media attention due to their extreme violence. People who report greater belief in pure evil (BPE; the tendency to attribute harmdoing to dispositionally sadistic individuals) generally favor harsher criminal punishment, regardless of whether criminals exhibit stereotypically “evil” traits. We examined whether BPE predicted evaluations of gun violence perpetrators despite different situational factors related to the shooter's and crime's circumsta...
Source
#1Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 21
#2Russell J. WebsterH-Index: 10
Last. Megan L. Strain (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 8
view all 6 authors...
Source
#2Donald A. Saucier (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 1
Abstract We examined the effects of belief in pure evil (BPE) and belief in pure good (BPG) on perceptions and evaluations of a stereotypically altruistic (vs. egoistic) hero who apprehended a criminal perpetrator. Overall, participants appreciably supported formal, public accolades for the altruistic hero because they more greatly deified (i.e., venerated) the altruistic hero. Greater levels of BPG were associated with greater deification only of the altruistic hero, and levels of BPG did not p...
Source
#1Russell J. WebsterH-Index: 10
#2Matt MotylH-Index: 23
Last. Nicolette (Lynn) MorroneH-Index: 1
view all 4 authors...
Source
#1Donald A. SaucierH-Index: 1
Source
#1Russell J. Webster (St. Mary's College of Maryland)H-Index: 10
#2Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 21
Do preconceived beliefs about evil influence perceptions and punishments of those who harm others? We examined the effects of belief in pure evil (BPE), demonization, and belief in retribution on punishment of a stereotypically (vs. non-stereotypically) evil criminal. Participants punished the stereotypically evil perpetrator more (i.e., greater recommended jail time, opposition to parole, and support for his execution) because of increases in demonization (i.e., greater perceptions of the crimi...
Source
#2Donald A. SaucierH-Index: 1
Source
This website uses cookies.
We use cookies to improve your online experience. By continuing to use our website we assume you agree to the placement of these cookies.
To learn more, you can find in our Privacy Policy.