L. J. Shrum
HEC Paris
AdvertisingConspicuous consumptionSocial exclusionProduct (category theory)Consumption (economics)Developmental psychologyBusinessMaterialismPsychologyMarketingCognitionCognitive psychologyCultivation theoryPerspective (graphical)PerceptionPower (social and political)Identity (social science)Self-esteemLonelinessContext (language use)PersuasionBrand namesTelevision viewingLinguisticsSocial psychology
127Publications
39H-index
6,411Citations
Publications 103
Newest
#1Alican Mecit (Skema Business School)
#2L. J. Shrum (HEC Paris)H-Index: 39
Last. Tina M. Lowrey (HEC Paris)H-Index: 25
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Abstract Gendered languages assign masculine and feminine grammatical gender to all nouns, including nonhuman entities null In French and Spanish, the name of the disease resulting from the virus (COVID-19) is grammatically feminine, whereas the virus that causes the disease (coronavirus) is masculine null In this research, we test whether the grammatical gender mark affects judgments null In a series of experiments with French and Spanish speakers, we show that grammatical gender affects virus-...
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#1Cristel Antonia Russell (Pepperdine University)H-Index: 2
#1Cristel Antonia Russell (Pepperdine University)H-Index: 29
Last. L. J. Shrum (HEC Paris)H-Index: 39
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Research has shown that television viewing cultivates a materialistic worldview in children. However, other socialization factors may also influence children's materialism. The current research tests two socialization pathways of parental influence: (a) an indirect path in which parents pass on their own materialism to their children, and the parent's materialism is at least partly the result of a parent cultivation effect (parent cultivation); (b) an indirect path in which parents pass on their...
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#1Ruth PogacarH-Index: 5
Last. Frank R. KardesH-Index: 50
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A brand name’s linguistic characteristics convey brand qualities independent of the name’s denotative meaning. For instance, name length, sounds, and stress can signal masculine or feminine associa...
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#1Elena Fumagalli (UTDT: Torcuato di Tella University)H-Index: 1
#1Elena Fumagalli (UTDT: Torcuato di Tella University)H-Index: 1
Last. L. J. Shrum (HEC Paris)H-Index: 1
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The current COVID-19 pandemic has had obvious, well-documented devastating effects on people’s physical health. In this research, we investigate its potential effects on people’s mental health. Many people have experienced social isolation, as countries attempt to stem the spread of the disease through confinement and other forms of social distancing. Intuitively, such social isolation may increase feelings of loneliness, and people may take logical steps to reduce their feelings of social isola...
1 CitationsSource
#1Weiwei Zhang (University of Otago)H-Index: 3
#1Weiwei Zhang (University of Otago)H-Index: 53
Last. Harlene Hayne (University of Otago)H-Index: 58
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In the absence of an effective vaccine or treatment, the current best defence against COVID-19 is social distancing - staying at home as much as possible, keeping distance from others, and avoiding large gatherings. Although social distancing improves physical health in terms of helping to reduce viral transmission, its psychological consequences are less clear, particularly its effects on memory. In this research, we investigated the effect of social distancing duration on negative moods and me...
3 CitationsSource
#1Gao F (Bentley University)
#1Fei Gao (Bentley University)H-Index: 1
Last. L. J. Shrum (HEC Paris)H-Index: 39
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Crossmodal sensory correspondences between shape and taste are well-established (e.g., angular–bitter, rounded–sweet). However, the extent to which these correspondences reliably influence consumer taste judgments is less clear, as are the processes underlying the effects. This research addresses both issues. Across seven experiments, we show that whether shape–taste correspondences influence taste judgments depends on their associative strength in memory, and that a significant shape–taste corr...
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#1Lan Nguyen Chaplin (UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago)H-Index: 13
#2Tina M. Lowrey (HEC Paris)H-Index: 25
Last. Kathleen D. Vohs (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 3
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Abstract Adults view past experiences as making them happier than material goods, yet products and brands are highly coveted by children, even at young ages. Using a child developmental framework, we reconcile these two perspectives. Across four studies with children and adolescents of ages 3–17 years, we show that children (ages 3–12) derive more happiness from goods than from experiences, but the effect changes over time. As children age, the happiness they derive from experiences increases, t...
3 CitationsSource
#1Mario PandelaereH-Index: 1
#1Mario PandelaereH-Index: 26
Last. L. J. ShrumH-Index: 39
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1 CitationsSource
#2Tina M. LowreyH-Index: 25
Last. L. J. ShrumH-Index: 39
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Consumers often anthropomorphize non-human entities. In this research, we investigate a novel antecedent of anthropomorphism: language. Some languages (e.g., English) make a grammatical distinction between humans (he, she) and non-humans (it), whereas other languages (e.g., French) do not (all objects are gender-marked). We propose that such grammatical structures of languages influence the way individuals mentally represent non-human entities, and as a result, their generalized tendencies to an...
#1Ruth PogacarH-Index: 5
#2Justin W. AngleH-Index: 6
Last. Tina M. LowreyH-Index: 25
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