Özden Melis Uluğ
Clark University
Gender studiesSociologyPsychologyIdeologyPolitical scienceNarrativePerspective (graphical)Social changeConflict resolutionIdentity (social science)Collective actionContext (language use)DisadvantagedTurkishSocial scienceCriminologySocial psychologyPandemicPoliticsSocial identity theory
37Publications
9H-index
180Citations
Publications 41
Newest
#4Betül Kanık (Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University)
Despite the ongoing shift in societal norms and gender-discriminatory practices toward more equality, many heterosexual women worldwide, including in many Western societies, choose to replace their birth surname with the family name of their spouse upon marriage. Previous research has demonstrated that the adherence to sexist ideologies (i.e., a system of discriminatory gender-based beliefs) among women is associated with their greater endorsement of practices and policies that maintain gender i...
Source
Source
#1Özden Melis Uluğ (University of Sussex)H-Index: 9
#2Yasemin Gülsüm Acar (Dund.: University of Dundee)H-Index: 5
Last. Betül Kanık (Hacettepe University)
view all 3 authors...
While researchers have long discussed the impact that ingroup-outgroup identities may have on participant-researcher dynamics, no previous study that we know of has investigated how these identities impact participants’ decisions to participate in research in conflict contexts. In this study, we aimed to examine participants’ perspectives on their decisions to participate in research and how those decisions may be related to both their and the researchers’ identities as well as other important d...
Source
OBJECTIVES Using the context of the Turkish-Kurdish conflict, Studies 1 and 2 tested how ethnic identification predicted support for minority rights through the pathway of the endorsement of the conflict narrative of the minority group (i.e., independence narrative) among Kurds (Study 1) and Turks (Study 2) in Turkey. Study 2 also tested whether the paths between (a) ethnic identification and endorsement of the minority group's conflict narrative and (b) endorsement of the minority group's confl...
Source
#1Maria Chayinska (UC: Pontifical Catholic University of Chile)H-Index: 4
#2Özden Melis Uluğ (Clark University)H-Index: 9
Last. Craig McGarty (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 49
view all 7 authors...
The present paper examines the extent to which conspiracy beliefs about the COVID-19 outbreak and distrust of epidemiological science are likely to predict optimistically biased risk perceptions at the individual and group levels. We explored the factor structure of coronavirus conspiracy beliefs and their associations with trust in science in predicting risk perceptions using survey data collected in Ukraine (N = 390), Turkey (N = 290), and Germany (N = 408). We further expected conspiracy beli...
Source
#1Özden Melis UluğH-Index: 9
#2Nevin SolakH-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
The coronavirus pandemic has caused unemployment to skyrocket, exposed the longstanding inequalities in health care services and working conditions, and mainly affected the poor in different parts of the world. In the current study, we focus on social identity and social class-related factors that are critical during the pandemic to gain insights into what predicts support for policies favoring economic equality in the post-pandemic period. We argue that to the extent that individuals 1) identif...
Source
#1Özden Melis UluğH-Index: 9
#2Maria ChayinskaH-Index: 4
Last. Linda R. TroppH-Index: 43
view all 3 authors...
The global rise in social protest movements has forced collective action scholars in various disciplines to think about theoretical models that can comprehensively explain phenomena related to protest participation and mobilization. Despite recent advances in collective action literature, we argue that collective action scholars in social psychology still face a) conceptual challenges, associated with lack of attention to con-tent and multiplicity of identities, b) methodological challenges, suc...
#1Özden Melis Uluğ (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 9
#2Linda R. Tropp (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 43
Source
#1Tabea Hässler (UZH: University of Zurich)H-Index: 3
#2Özden Melis Uluğ (Clark University)H-Index: 9
Last. Giovanni A. Travaglino (UKC: University of Kent)H-Index: 10
view all 4 authors...
Previous research has shown that positive intergroup contact among disadvantaged group members may predict a so-called ‘sedative’ effect according to which positive contact is associated with reduced support for social change. Conversely, positive contact is associated with increased support for social change toward equality among advantaged group members. This raises the important question of under which circumstances intergroup contact can encourage support for social change among both disadva...
Source
#1Özden Melis Uluğ (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 9
#2Rezarta Bilali (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 13
Last. Leah Malo (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 1
view all 4 authors...
Source
This website uses cookies.
We use cookies to improve your online experience. By continuing to use our website we assume you agree to the placement of these cookies.
To learn more, you can find in our Privacy Policy.