Markus Werkle-Bergner
Max Planck Society
Sleep in non-human animalsRhythmDevelopmental psychologySleep spindlePsychologyNeuroscienceCognitionCognitive psychologyYoung adultWorking memoryLocus coeruleusHippocampusYounger adultsAge differencesComputer scienceMemory consolidationElectroencephalographyAudiologyEpisodic memorySensory system
115Publications
29H-index
2,396Citations
Publications 95
Newest
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#1Claire Pauley (MPG: Max Planck Society)
#2Verena R. Sommer (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 4
Last. Myriam C. Sander (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 12
view all 6 authors...
One important factor contributing to age-related memory decline is the loss of distinctiveness with which information is represented in brain activity. This loss in neural selectivity may be driven by neural attenuation (i.e., reduced activation to target stimuli) or neural broadening (i.e., increased activation to non-target stimuli). In this fMRI study, we assessed age differences in neural selectivity during first encoding, repeated encoding, and recognition, as well as the underlying pattern...
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#1Barbara Sikora-Wachowicz (Jagiellonian University)H-Index: 2
#2Attila Keresztes (ELTE: Eötvös Loránd University)H-Index: 9
Last. Magdalena Fafrowicz (Jagiellonian University)H-Index: 10
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Abstract While the knowledge on age-related differences in susceptibility to episodic false memories is extensive, little is known about this phenomenon in visual short-term memory (STM). Our previous behavioural research indicated that older adults are more confident of their erroneous STM recognitions than young adults. However, unlike in episodic memory, we did not find support for older adults’ higher rate of false alarms. To further understand this specific age-difference, here we investiga...
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#1Shelby L. Bachman (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 5
#2Martin J. Dahl (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 5
Last. Mara Mather (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 68
view all 8 authors...
Abstract There is growing evidence that neuronal integrity of the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) is important for later-life cognition. Less understood is how LC integrity relates to brain correlates of cognition, such as brain structure. Here, we examined the relationship between cortical thickness and a measure reflecting LC integrity in older (n = 229) and younger adults (n = 67). Using a magnetic resonance imaging sequence which yields high signal intensity in the LC, we assessed the con...
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#1Myriam C. Sander (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 12
#2Yana Fandakova (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 15
Last. Markus Werkle-Bergner (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 29
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Episodic memory decline is a hallmark of cognitive aging and a multifaceted phenomenon. We review studies that target age differences across different memory processing stages, i.e., from encoding to retrieval. The available evidence suggests that age differences during memory formation may affect the quality of memory representations in an age-graded manner with downstream consequences for later processing stages. We argue that low memory quality in combination with age-related neural ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Verena R. Sommer (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 4
#2Luzie Mount (Technical University of Dortmund)H-Index: 1
Last. Myriam C. Sander (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 12
view all 5 authors...
Abstract The specificity with which past experiences can be remembered varies across the lifespan, possibly due to differences in how precisely information is encoded. Memory formation can be investigated through repetition effects, the common finding that neural activity is altered when stimuli are repeated. However, whether differences in this indirect measure of memory formation relate to lifespan differences in memory specificity has not yet been established. In the present study, we examine...
3 CitationsSource
#1Martin J. Dahl (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 5
#2Mara Mather (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 68
Last. John M. Ringman (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 27
view all 7 authors...
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#1Martin J. Dahl (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 5
#2Mara Mather (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 68
Last. Markus Werkle-Bergner (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 29
view all 4 authors...
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#1Martin J. Dahl (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 1
#1Martin J. Dahl (SC: University of Southern California)
Last. Helena C. Chui (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 91
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Abstract Abnormally phosphorylated tau, an indicator of Alzheimer’s disease, accumulates in the first decades of life in the locus coeruleus (LC), the brain’s main norepinephrine supply. However, technical challenges in reliable in-vivo assessments have impeded research into the role of the LC in Alzheimer’s disease. We studied participants with or known to be at-risk for mutations in genes causing autosomal-dominant Alzheimer’s disease (ADAD) of early onset, providing a unique window into the p...
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#1Ann-Kathrin Joechner (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 1
#2Sarah Wehmeier (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 1
Last. Markus Werkle-Bergner (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 29
view all 3 authors...
In young adults, memory consolidation during sleep is supported by a time-coordinated interplay of sleep spindles and slow oscillations. However, given tremendous developmental changes in sleep spindle and slow oscillation morphology, it remains elusive whether the same mechanisms as identified in young adults are comparably functional across childhood. Here, we characterise slow and fast sleep spindles and their temporal coupling to slow oscillations in 24 pre-school children. Further, we ask w...
2 CitationsSource