Casey Rosen-Carole
University of Rochester
InfectivityDevelopmental psychologyPsychologyNursingAntibodyIntensive care medicineHealth promotionPediatricsProspective cohort studyPrenatal careBreastfeedingLactationTransmission (medicine)Center (algebra and category theory)FrenulumInfant formulaPregnancyMEDLINEProtocol (science)Supplementary FeedingsInfant Nutritional Physiological PhenomenaTerm BirthBreastfeeding supportBreast feedingLesbian gay bisexual transgender queerInfant newbornFamily medicineTerm (time)RNAQuality managementMedicine
23Publications
5H-index
138Citations
Publications 22
Newest
Abstract null null Infant children of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, plus (LGBTQI+) families may be at risk for health disparities from birth in the form of reduced access to human milk. Children raised in LGBTQI+ families thrive on par with children raised in heterosexual, cisgender families; however, given the range of anatomy and fertility that may exist within LGBTQ+ families, they may be unable to offer a parent’s human milk to their children. Therefore it is critical for provi...
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#1Lawrence NobleH-Index: 11
#2Casey Rosen-CaroleH-Index: 5
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#1Casey Rosen-Carole (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 5
#2Shinya Ito (U of T: University of Toronto)
On March 19, 2019, Brexanolone (Zulresso ™) was released as the first-ever FDA-approved medication specifically for the treatment of postpartum depression by Sage Therapeutics, Inc. Unfortunately, its use in breastfeeding mothers was not evaluated and is being restricted. An efficacious drug for postpartum depression stands to benefit many families. However, the lack of guidance for breastfeeding patients, and the resultant restrictions on breastfeeding by insurance companies is deeply troubling...
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#1Shalini Shah (UR: University of Rochester)
#2Paul D. Allen (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 77
Last. Margo K. McKenna Benoit (UR: University of Rochester)
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OBJECTIVES There is debate among otolaryngologists and other practitioners about whether upper lip tie contributes to difficulty with breastfeeding and whether upper lip tie and ankyloglossia are linked. Our objectives were to evaluate the anatomy of the upper lip (maxillary) frenulum, to determine if the visual anatomy of the upper lip has an effect on breastfeeding, and to determine whether the occurrence of lip tie and tongue tie are correlated. METHODS A prospective cohort study of 100 healt...
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#1Claire Narang (Johns Hopkins University)
#2Casey Rosen-Carole (URMC: University of Rochester Medical Center)H-Index: 5
Last. Sandra H. Jee (URMC: University of Rochester Medical Center)H-Index: 15
view all 7 authors...
This case reports an ethical dilemma in which a mother who had recently delivered a baby through cesarean section after sustaining life-threatening injuries in a car accident did not have documented wishes whether she wanted to breastfeed. Her medical condition rendered her temporarily mentally incapacitated and critically ill, and the lactation medicine team was consulted about whether lactation choice should be preserved by pumping. Complicating considerations in this case were (1) lack of fam...
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#1Casey Rosen-Carole (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 5
#2Jill S. Halterman (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 48
Last. Ann Dozier (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 22
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BACKGROUND Breastfeeding rates for United States women with lower incomes fall below the government's Healthy People 2020 Goals. Breastfeeding recommendations combined with support from providers and peer counselors help women decide to begin and sustain breastfeeding, but peer counselor uptake is low. RESEARCH AIM To evaluate changes in referrals to Women, Infants, and Children's Supplemental Nutrition Program peer counselors, reported prenatal provider education and support, and breastfeeding ...
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A central goal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine is the development of clinical protocols for managing common medical problems that may impact breastfeeding success. These protocols serve on...
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#1Ryan M. Pace (UIdaho: University of Idaho)H-Index: 10
#2Janet E. Williams (UIdaho: University of Idaho)H-Index: 21
Last. Michelle K. McGuire (UIdaho: University of Idaho)H-Index: 34
view all 21 authors...
ABSTRACT Whether mother-to-infant SARS-CoV-2 transmission can occur during breastfeeding and, if so, whether the benefits of breastfeeding outweigh this risk during maternal COVID-19 illness remain important questions. Using RT-qPCR, we did not detect SARS-CoV-2 RNA in any milk sample (n = 37) collected from 18 women following COVID-19 diagnosis. Although we detected evidence of viral RNA on 8 out of 70 breast skin swabs, only one was considered a conclusive positive result. In contrast, 76% of ...
7 CitationsSource
#1Ryan M. Pace (UIdaho: University of Idaho)H-Index: 10
#2Janet E. Williams (UIdaho: University of Idaho)H-Index: 21
Last. Michelle K. McGuire (UIdaho: University of Idaho)H-Index: 34
view all 21 authors...
Background It is not known whether SARS-CoV-2 can be transmitted from mother to infant during breastfeeding, and if so whether the benefits of breastfeeding outweigh this risk. This study was designed to evaluate 1) if SARS-CoV-2 RNA can be detected in milk and on the breast of infected women, 2) concentrations of milk-borne anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, and 3) the capacity of milk to neutralize SARS-CoV-2 infectivity. Methods We collected 37 milk samples and 70 breast swabs (before and after brea...
14 CitationsSource
#1Rita Lynne Ferri (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 3
#2Casey Rosen-Carole (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 5
Last. Katherine Blumoff Greenberg (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 3
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2 CitationsSource
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