Autumn B. Hostetter
Kalamazoo College
Embodied cognitionMotion (physics)Human–computer interactionMathematics educationNonverbal communicationPsychologyGesture recognitionCognitionCoding (social sciences)Cognitive psychologyIllusionCognitive scienceGesturePerceptionAction (philosophy)Test (assessment)Task (project management)Gesture productionMental imageComputer scienceLinguisticsSpeech productionCommunicationComprehension
43Publications
16H-index
1,409Citations
Publications 44
Newest
#1Naomi Sweller (Macquarie University)H-Index: 20
#2Kazuki Sekine (Waseda University)H-Index: 3
Last. Autumn B. Hostetter (Kalamazoo College)H-Index: 16
view all 3 authors...
Source
#1Mitchell J. Nathan (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 29
#2Amelia Yeo (NIE: National Institute of Education)H-Index: 4
Last. Martha W. Alibali (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 54
view all 5 authors...
Abstract We developed and tested a survey instrument to measure teachers’ attitudes about gesture in learning and instruction (TAGLI). Teachers (N = 192) generally believed that instructional gestures are beneficial for learning, and not distracting for students. Teachers had positive expectations, both for gestures that are redundant with (i.e., match) the accompanying speech, and gestures that are complementary to (i.e., mismatch) speech. However, teachers’ attitudes varied with teachers’ grad...
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#2Wim T. J. L. Pouw (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 10
Speakers often use gesture to demonstrate how to perform actions-for example, they might show how to open the top of a jar by making a twisting motion above the jar. Yet it is unclear whether listeners learn as much from seeing such gestures as they learn from seeing actions that physically change the position of objects (i.e., actually opening the jar). Here, we examined participants' implicit and explicit understanding about a series of movements that demonstrated how to move a set of objects....
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#1Wim T. J. L. Pouw (EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)H-Index: 10
#2S.I. Wassenburg (EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)H-Index: 6
Last. Fred Paas (EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)H-Index: 92
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Co-speech gestures have been proposed to strengthen sensorimotor knowledge related to objects’ weight and manipulability. This pre-registered study (https://www.osf.io/9uh6q/) was designed to explore how gestures affect memory for sensorimotor information through the application of the visual-haptic size-weight illusion (i.e., objects weigh the same, but are experienced as different in weight). With this paradigm, a discrepancy can be induced between participants’ conscious illusory perception o...
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#1Autumn B. Hostetter (Kalamazoo College)H-Index: 16
#2Christina M. Dandar (Kalamazoo College)
Last. Colin Grogan (Kalamazoo College)
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Auditory pitch is represented on a vertical continuum (e.g., high vs. low). In three experiments, we examined whether the kinesthetic experience of moving in a particular direction (e.g., walking up vs. down stairs; reaching up vs. down) would affect judgments of auditory pitch. Participants listened to three tones twice each, once while moving upward and once while moving downward, and estimated the pitch of each tone. In all experiments, participants’ judgments of the tones’ pitch were biased ...
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#1Kevin Kamermans (EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)H-Index: 3
#2Wim T. J. L. Pouw (UConn: University of Connecticut)H-Index: 10
Last. Autumn B. Hostetter (Kalamazoo College)H-Index: 16
view all 6 authors...
Abstract In two experiments, we examined the role of gesture in reinterpreting a mental image. In Experiment 1, we found that participants gestured more about a figure they had learned through manual exploration than about a figure they had learned through vision. This supports claims that gestures emerge from the activation of perception-relevant actions during mental imagery. In Experiment 2, we investigated whether such gestures have a causal role in affecting the quality of mental imagery. P...
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#1Autumn B. Hostetter (Kalamazoo College)H-Index: 16
#2Martha W. Alibali (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 54
The Gesture as Simulated Action (GSA) framework was proposed to explain how gestures arise from embodied simulations of the motor and perceptual states that occur during speaking and thinking (Hostetter & Alibali, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 15, 495–514, 2008). In this review, we revisit the framework’s six main predictions regarding gesture rates, gesture form, and the cognitive cost of inhibiting gesture. We find that the available evidence largely supports the main predictions of the frame...
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#1Autumn B. Hostetter (Kalamazoo College)H-Index: 16
#2Elizabeth A Penix (Kalamazoo College)H-Index: 1
Last. Thomas H. Carr (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 48
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Retrieval practice (e.g., testing) has been shown to facilitate long-term retention of information. In two experiments, we examine whether retrieval practice also facilitates use of the practised i...
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#1Autumn B. Hostetter (Kalamazoo College)H-Index: 16
#2Stuart H. Murch (Kalamazoo College)H-Index: 1
Last. Cierra S. Gillard (Kalamazoo College)H-Index: 1
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Abstract We examined the cognitive resources involved in processing speech with gesture compared to the same speech without gesture across four studies using a dual-task paradigm. Participants viewed videos of a woman describing spatial arrays either with gesture or without. They then attempted to choose the target array from among four choices. Participants’ cognitive load was measured as they completed this comprehension task by measuring how well they could remember the location and identity ...
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#2Wim T. J. L. PouwH-Index: 10
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