Liangbing Hu
University of Maryland, College Park
FabricationNanoparticleComposite materialNanotechnologyElectrodeMaterials scienceCelluloseOxideGrapheneChemical engineeringOptoelectronicsCathodeCarbon nanotubeLithiumBattery (electricity)PorosityElectrolyteEnergy storageAnodeNanofiber
476Publications
125H-index
49.1kCitations
Publications 474
Newest
#1Zhiqiang Liang (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 19
#2Yonggang Yao (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 52
Last. Michael R. Zachariah (UCR: University of California, Riverside)H-Index: 85
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#1Yun Qiao (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 24
#2Chaoji Chen (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 60
Last. Liangbing Hu (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 125
view all 10 authors...
The conventional thermal treatment systems typically feature low ramping/cooling rates, which lead to steep thermal gradients that generate inefficient, nonuniform reaction conditions and result in nanoparticle aggregation. Herein, we demonstrate a continuous fly-through material synthesis approach using a novel high-temperature reactor design based on the emerging thermal-shock technology. By facing two sheets of carbon paper with a small distance apart (1-3 mm), uniform and ultrahigh temperatu...
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#1Yonggang Yao (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 52
#2Zhennan Huang (UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago)H-Index: 17
Last. Liangbing Hu (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 125
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Summary The ability to alloy different elements is critical for property tuning and materials discovery. However, general alloying at the nanoscale remains extremely challenging due to strong immiscibility and easy oxidation, particularly for early transition metals that are highly reactive. Here, we report nanoscale alloying using a high-temperature- and high-entropy-based strategy (T∗ΔSmix) to significantly expand the possible alloys and include early transition metals. While high-temperature ...
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#1Emily Hitz (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 32
#2Hua Xie (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 26
Last. Liangbing Hu (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 125
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#1Tangyuan Li (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 15
#2Yonggang Yao (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 52
Last. Liangbing Hu (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 125
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#1Jianguo Li (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 2
#2Chaoji Chen (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 60
Last. Liangbing Hu (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 125
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Reeds are fast-growing plants continuously transporting and evaporating water from roots through the stem and leaves into the environment. Inspired by this naturally occurring process, we developed a high-performance evaporator with a decoupling fluidic transport and evaporation pathway by engineering the natural reed's structure via chemical delignification. The lignin removal enlarges the diameter of reed's multiscale channels and opens more pits and nanopores connecting these aligned channels...
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#1Yao Yang (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 7
#2Jihan Zhou (PKU: Peking University)H-Index: 12
Last. Jianwei Miao (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 53
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Amorphous solids such as glass, plastics and amorphous thin films are ubiquitous in our daily life and have broad applications ranging from telecommunications to electronics and solar cells1-4. However, owing to the lack of long-range order, the three-dimensional (3D) atomic structure of amorphous solids has so far eluded direct experimental determination5-15. Here we develop an atomic electron tomography reconstruction method to experimentally determine the 3D atomic positions of an amorphous s...
2 CitationsSource
#1Haiyu Qiao (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 5
#2Xizheng Wang (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 13
Last. Liangbing Hu (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 125
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Abstract Transition metal phosphates are a class of catalysts that are widely used in biologic reactions, organic synthesis, oxygen evolution, and photocatalysis. While previous studies have shown the catalytic performance can be greatly benefited from incorporating multiple elements, high entropy polyanionic materials such as high-entropy phosphates (HEPi) have never been reported due to the harsh synthetic requirement of a short high-temperature heating duration. Herein we for the first time r...
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#1Qinqin Xia (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 6
#2Chaoji Chen (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 60
Last. Liangbing Hu (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 125
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Renewable and biodegradable materials derived from biomass are attractive candidates to replace non-biodegradable petrochemical plastics. However, the mechanical performance and wet stability of biomass are generally insufficient for practical applications. Herein, we report a facile in situ lignin regeneration strategy to synthesize a high-performance bioplastic from lignocellulosic resources (for example, wood). In this process, the porous matrix of natural wood is deconstructed to form a homo...
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