Jonathan W. Pitchford
University of York
PlanktonEcosystemOceanographyLévy flightAlgal bloomRandom walkStochastic modellingEconometricsForagingHabitatBiological systemPredationEcologyFisheries managementMarine reserveGrowth rateContext (language use)PopulationMathematicsEnvironmental scienceComputer scienceFisheryFishingFish stockContrast (statistics)Biology
62Publications
26H-index
2,511Citations
Publications 60
Newest
#1Michael J. Bottery (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 8
#2Jonathan W. Pitchford (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 26
Last. Ville-Petri Friman (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 28
view all 3 authors...
Accumulating evidence suggests that the response of bacteria to antibiotics is significantly affected by the presence of other interacting microbes. These interactions are not typically accounted for when determining pathogen sensitivity to antibiotics. In this perspective, we argue that resistance and evolutionary responses to antibiotic treatments should not be considered only a trait of an individual bacteria species but also an emergent property of the microbial community in which pathogens ...
10 CitationsSource
#1Samuel Carmichael (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 2
#2Ben Powell (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 4
Last. Jonathan W. Pitchford (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 26
view all 5 authors...
Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease which kills an estimated 50,000 people each year, with its deadly impact confined mainly to lower to middle income countries. Leishmania parasites are transmitted to human hosts by sand fly vectors during blood feeding. Recent experimental work shows that transmission is modulated by the patchy landscape of infection in the host's skin, and the parasite population dynamics within the vector. Here we assimilate these new findings into a simple probabi...
2 CitationsSource
#1Paula A. Avello (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 1
#2Seth J. Davis (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 51
Last. Jonathan W. Pitchford (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 26
view all 3 authors...
Abstract The biological interactions underpinning the Arabidopsis circadian clock have been systematically uncovered and explored by biological experiments and mathematical models. This is captured by a series of published ordinary differential equation (ODE) models, which describe plant clock dynamics in response to light/dark conditions. However, understanding the role of temperature in resetting the clock (entrainment) and the mechanisms by which circadian rhythms maintain a near-24 h period ...
2 CitationsSource
#1Dominic D. R. Burns (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 4
#2Jonathan W. Pitchford (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 26
Last. Elva J. H. Robinson (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 23
view all 5 authors...
A challenge faced by individuals and groups of many species is determining how resources and activities should be spatially distributed: centralized or decentralized. This distribution problem is hard to understand due to the many costs and benefits of each strategy in different settings. Ant colonies are faced by this problem and demonstrate two solutions: (1) Centralizing resources in a single nest (monodomy); and (2) Decentralizing by spreading resources across many nests (polydomy). Despite ...
5 CitationsSource
Rhythmic data are ubiquitous in the life sciences. Biologists need reliable statistical tests to identify whether a particular experimental treatment has caused a significant change in a rhythmic signal. When these signals display nonstationary behaviour, as is common in many biological systems, the established methodologies may be misleading. Therefore, there is a real need for new methodology that enables the formal comparison of nonstationary processes. As circadian behaviour is best understo...
2 CitationsSource
Private efforts to prevent and control biological pests and infectious diseases can be a public good, and so incentivizing private biosecurity management actions is both desirable and problematic. Compensation contracts can encourage biosecurity efforts, provide support against the collapse of economic sectors, and create an insurance network. We conceptualise a novel biosecurity instrument relying on formal compensation private-public partnerships using contract theory. Our framework explains h...
5 CitationsSource
#1Jonathan Reid Woodward (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 1
#2Jonathan W. Pitchford (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 26
Last. Martin A. Bees (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 20
view all 3 authors...
Oceanic flows do not necessarily mix planktonic species. Differences in individual organisms’ physical and hydrodynamic properties can cause changes in drift normal to the mean flow, leading to seg...
5 CitationsSource
#1Paula A. Avello (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 1
#2Seth J. Davis (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 51
Last. Jonathan W. Pitchford (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 26
view all 4 authors...
The circadian clock is a biological mechanism that permits some organisms to anticipate daily environmental variations. This clock generates biological rhythms, which can be reset by environmental cues such as cycles of light or temperature, a process known as entrainment. After entrainment, circadian rhythms typically persist with approximately 24 hours periodicity in free-running conditions, i.e. in the absence of environmental cues. Experimental evidence also shows that a free-running period ...
12 CitationsSource
#1Christopher A. Griffiths (University of Sheffield)H-Index: 4
#2Toby A. Patterson (O&A: CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research)H-Index: 24
Last. Paul G. Blackwell (University of Sheffield)H-Index: 32
view all 7 authors...
Understanding how, where, and when animals move is a central problem in marine ecology and conservation. Key to improving our knowledge about what drives animal movement is the rising deployment of telemetry devices on a range of free‐roaming species. An increasingly popular way of gaining meaningful inference from an animal's recorded movements is the application of hidden Markov models (HMMs), which allow for the identification of latent behavioral states in the movement paths of individuals. ...
6 CitationsSource
Rhythmic processes are found at all biological and ecological scales, and are fundamental to the efficient functioning of living systems in changing environments. The biochemical mechanisms underpinning these rhythms are therefore of importance, especially in the context of anthropogenic challenges such as pollution or changes in climate and land use. Here we develop and test a new method for clustering rhythmic biological data with a focus on circadian oscillations. The method combines locally ...
3 CitationsSource