Ruth Pogacar
University of Calgary
AdvertisingMachine learningProduct (category theory)PhoneticsBusinessArtificial intelligencePsychologyMarketingExtant taxonSound symbolismCognitive psychologyOnline research methodsSoftwareImplicit-association testLanguage complexityPersuasionR packageImplicit biasBrand namesConsumer informationImplicit associationComputer scienceLinguisticsMode (computer interface)DefaultSocial psychology
25Publications
5H-index
118Citations
Publications 20
Newest
#1Ruth PogacarH-Index: 5
Last. Frank R. KardesH-Index: 50
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A brand name’s linguistic characteristics convey brand qualities independent of the name’s denotative meaning. For instance, name length, sounds, and stress can signal masculine or feminine associa...
Source
#1Thomas P. Carpenter (SPU: Seattle Pacific University)H-Index: 9
#2Ruth Pogacar (U of C: University of Calgary)H-Index: 5
Last. Aleksandr Chakroff (Harvard University)H-Index: 4
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The implicit association test (IAT) is widely used in psychology. Unfortunately, the IAT cannot be run within online surveys, requiring researchers who conduct online surveys to rely on third-party tools. We introduce a novel method for constructing IATs using online survey software (Qualtrics); we then empirically assess its validity. Study 1 (student n = 239) revealed good psychometric properties, expected IAT effects, and expected correlations with explicit measures for survey-software IATs. ...
20 CitationsSource
#1Ruth Pogacar (U of C: University of Calgary)H-Index: 5
#2Thomas P. Carpenter (SPU: Seattle Pacific University)H-Index: 9
Last. Michal Kouril (Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center)H-Index: 14
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Source
#1Ruth Pogacar (U of C: University of Calgary)H-Index: 5
#2L. J. Shrum (HEC Paris)H-Index: 39
Last. Tina M. Lowrey (HEC Paris)H-Index: 25
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People—be they politicians, marketers, job candidates, product reviewers, bloggers, or romantic interests—often use linguistic devices to persuade others, and there is a sizeable literature that has documented the effects of numerous linguistic devices. However, understanding the implications of these effects is difficult without an organizing framework. To this end, we introduce a Language Complexity × Processing Mode Framework for classifying linguistic devices based on two continuous dimensio...
6 CitationsSource
#2Michal KourilH-Index: 14
Last. Naomi IsenbergH-Index: 3
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#2Ruth PogacarH-Index: 5
Last. Naomi IsenbergH-Index: 3
view all 8 authors...
#2Ruth PogacarH-Index: 5
Last. Naomi IsenbergH-Index: 3
view all 8 authors...
#2Michal KourilH-Index: 14
Last. Naomi IsenbergH-Index: 3
view all 8 authors...
#1Ruth Pogacar (U of C: University of Calgary)H-Index: 5
#2Michal KourilH-Index: 14
Last. James J. Kellaris (UC: University of Cincinnati)H-Index: 26
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This research shows that people implicitly and explicitly prefer sounds that are more common among top brand names (e.g., “S,” “M,” “L,” and “E”). Implicit preferences correlate with explicit willingness to pay more for hypothetical brands with preferred sounds. This suggests that the prevalence of certain sounds among top brands may be a reflection of people’s phonetic preferences. We examine possible processes underlying phonetic preferences, and offer evidence excluding phonetic embodiment, p...
8 CitationsSource
#1L. J. ShrumH-Index: 39
#2Tina M. LowreyH-Index: 25
Last. Ruth PogacarH-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
People—be they politicians, marketers, job candidates, product reviewers, bloggers, or romantic interests—often use linguistic devices to persuade others, and there is a sizeable literature that has documented the effects of numerous linguistic devices. However, understanding the implications of these effects is difficult without an organizing framework. To this end, we introduce a Language Complexity × Processing Mode Framework for classifying linguistic devices based on two continuous dimensio...