Kate B. Nooner
University of North Carolina at Wilmington
PsychiatryMental healthDevelopmental psychologyDemographyPsychologyCognitionNeurocognitiveInjury preventionYoung adultBinge drinkingDepression (differential diagnoses)Alcohol use disorderIntervention (counseling)Child abusePoison controlFunctional brainTrauma symptomsElectroencephalographySuicide preventionAnxietyEvent-related potentialClinical psychologyLatent class modelMedicineCohort
34Publications
9H-index
1,259Citations
Publications 34
Newest
#1Delin Sun (Veterans Health Administration)H-Index: 11
#2Viraj Adduru (Veterans Health Administration)H-Index: 4
Last. Rajendra A. Morey (Duke University)H-Index: 34
view all 16 authors...
Objective: Cortical thickness changes dramatically during development and is influenced by adolescent drinking. However, previous findings have been inconsistent and limited by region-of-interest approaches that are underpowered because they do not conform to the underlying heterogeneity from the effects of alcohol. Methods: Adolescents (n=657; 12-22 years at baseline) from the National Consortium on Alcohol and Neurodevelopment in Adolescence (NCANDA) who endorsed little to no alcohol use at ba...
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#1Connor J. McCabe (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 11
#2Tamara L. Wall (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 52
Last. Susan F. Tapert (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 88
view all 9 authors...
BACKGROUND Dual systems theories suggest that greater imbalance between higher reward sensitivity and lower cognitive control across adolescence conveys risk for behaviors such as heavy episodic drinking (HED). Prior research demonstrated that psychological analogues of these systems, sensation seeking and premeditation, change from childhood through emerging adulthood, and each has been independently linked with HED. However, few studies have assessed whether change over time in these developin...
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#1Maria Alejandra Infante (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 2
#2Yi Zhang (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 13
Last. Wesley K. ThompsonH-Index: 68
view all 18 authors...
The age- and time-dependent effects of binge-drinking on adolescent brain development have not been well characterized even though binge drinking is a health crisis among adolescents. The impact of binge drinking on gray matter volume development was examined using longitudinal data from the National Consortium on Alcohol and NeuroDevelopment in Adolescence (NCANDA). Non-binge drinkers (n=177) were matched to binge drinkers (n=164) on potential confounders. Number of binge drinking episodes in t...
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#1Qingyu Zhao (Stanford University)H-Index: 8
#2Edith V. Sullivan (Stanford University)H-Index: 111
Last. Kilian M. Pohl (Stanford University)H-Index: 27
view all 17 authors...
Importance Maturation of white matter fiber systems subserves cognitive, behavioral, emotional, and motor development during adolescence. Hazardous drinking during this active neurodevelopmental period may alter the trajectory of white matter microstructural development, potentially increasing risk for developing alcohol-related dysfunction and alcohol use disorder in adulthood. Objective To identify disrupted adolescent microstructural brain development linked to drinking onset and to assess wh...
1 CitationsSource
#1Qingyu Zhao (Stanford University)H-Index: 8
#2Edith V. Sullivan (Stanford University)H-Index: 111
Last. Kilian M. Pohl (Stanford University)H-Index: 27
view all 22 authors...
: Exogenous causes, such as alcohol use, and endogenous factors, such as temperament and sex, can modulate developmental trajectories of adolescent neurofunctional maturation. We examined how these factors affect sexual dimorphism in brain functional networks in youth drinking below diagnostic threshold for alcohol use disorder (AUD). Based on the 3-year, annually acquired, longitudinal resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data of 526 adolescents (12-21 years at baseline) fr...
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#1Kevin CumminsH-Index: 21
#2Kate B. NoonerH-Index: 9
Last. Sandra A. Brown (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 124
view all 11 authors...
Background: Longitudinal studies of many health behaviors often rely on infrequent self-report assessments. The measurement of psychoactive substance use among youth is expected to improve with more frequent mobile assessments, which can reduce recall bias. Researchers have used mobile devices for longitudinal research, but studies that last years and assess youth continuously at a fine-grained, temporal level (eg, weekly) are rare. A tailored mobile app (mNCANDA [mobile National Consortium on A...
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#1Kate B. Nooner (UNCW: University of North Carolina at Wilmington)H-Index: 9
#2Tammy Chung (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 51
Last. Linda B. Cottler (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 66
view all 8 authors...
The novel coronavirus pandemic that emerged in late 2019 (COVID-19) has created challenges not previously experienced in human research. This paper discusses two large-scale NIH-funded multi-site longitudinal studies of adolescents and young adults-- the National Consortium on Alcohol and Neurodevelopment in Adolescence (NCANDA) and the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study-- and valuable approaches to learn about adaptive processes for conducting developmentally sensitive research...
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#1Kate B. Nooner (UNCW: University of North Carolina at Wilmington)H-Index: 9
#2Michael D. De Bellis (Duke University)H-Index: 49
Last. Ty Brumback (Northern Kentucky University)H-Index: 15
view all 5 authors...
Background: Life events experienced during adolescence are associated with risk and resilience to heavy episodic drinking (HED; i.e. binge drinking). The current study builds on prior research using latent class analysis (LCA) to examine heterogeneity in patterns of adolescent life events at baseline to HED over the course of three years (4 timepoints) as part of the National Consortium on Alcohol and Neurodevelopment in Adolescence (NCANDA). Methods: Life event classes were modeled using LCA th...
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#1Sarita Silveira (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 8
#2Rutvik V. Shah (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 1
Last. Jyoti Mishra (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 18
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Background Childhood trauma is known to impart risk to several adverse life outcomes. Yet, its impact during adolescent development is not well understood. Here, we aimed to investigate the relationship between childhood trauma, functional brain connectivity, executive dysfunction (ED), and the development of high-risk drinking in adolescence. Methods Data from the National Consortium on Alcohol & Neurodevelopment in Adolescence (NCANDA, n=392, 55% female) cohort were used. This include...
7 CitationsSource
#1Michael D. De Bellis (Duke University)H-Index: 49
#2Kate B. Nooner (UNCW: University of North Carolina at Wilmington)H-Index: 9
Last. Sandra A. Brown (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 124
view all 6 authors...
Purpose of study Approximately two thirds of youth report experiencing or witnessing a trauma. It is not known whether trauma or the posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) following trauma increases adolescent drinking risk. Recent findings We described trauma experienced by the National Consortium on Alcohol and Neurodevelopment in Adolescence (NCANDA) longitudinal sample (N=831) participants and examined drinking over 4 years. We hypothesize that more traumatic events and PTSS will predict trans...
1 CitationsSource