Nir Shalev
University of Oxford
RhythmDevelopmental psychologyNeuropsychologyStimulus (physiology)Artificial intelligencePsychologyVisual searchNeuroscienceCognitionVisual perceptionCognitive psychologyAlertnessPerceptionNeglectDistractionContinuous performance taskArrowTask (project management)Attention deficitsFixation pointVisual attentionConscious perceptionPoison controlComputer visionComputer scienceDyslexiaAudiologyDissociation (neuropsychology)
27Publications
7H-index
121Citations
Publications 26
Newest
#1Nir ShalevH-Index: 7
Last. Anna C. NobreH-Index: 88
view all 5 authors...
Source
#1Nir Shalev (University of Oxford)H-Index: 7
#2Hannah Wilkinson (University of Oxford)
Last. Anna C. Nobre (University of Oxford)H-Index: 88
view all 5 authors...
Source
#1Nir Shalev (University of Oxford)H-Index: 7
Last. Magdalena Chechlacz (University of Birmingham)H-Index: 20
view all 3 authors...
Age-related deterioration of attention decreases the ability to stay focused on the task at hand due to less efficient selection of relevant information and increased distractibility in the face of irrelevant, but salient stimuli. While older (compared with younger) adults may have difficulty suppressing salient distractors, the extent of these challenges differs vastly across individuals. Cognitive reserve measured by proxies of cognitively enriching life experiences, such as education, occupat...
Source
#1Nir Shalev (University of Oxford)H-Index: 7
#2Anna C. Nobre (University of Oxford)H-Index: 88
To perform a task continuously over an extended period of time, it is necessary to maintain an adequate level of arousal. In cognitive research, traditional studies have used repetitive, monotonous tasks to learn about the dynamics of arousal in tasks that require sustained vigilance, such as driving or monitoring a factory line. To date, studies have rarely considered whether observers use task-embedded regularities in such continuous contexts to anticipate events and regulate arousal according...
Source
#1Margaret Jane Moore (University of Oxford)H-Index: 5
#2Nir Shalev (University of Oxford)H-Index: 7
Last. Nele Demeyere (University of Oxford)H-Index: 15
view all 4 authors...
ABSTRACTConsistently lateralized reading errors are commonly understood as side-effects of visuospatial neglect impairment. There is however a qualitative difference between systematically omitting...
2 CitationsSource
#1Nir Shalev (University of Oxford)H-Index: 7
#2Sage E. P. Boettcher (University of Oxford)H-Index: 8
Last. Anna C. Nobre (University of Oxford)H-Index: 88
view all 3 authors...
Source
#1Nir Shalev (University of Oxford)H-Index: 7
#2Signe Vangkilde (UCPH: University of Copenhagen)H-Index: 18
Last. Magdalena ChechlaczH-Index: 20
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Visual attention enables us to prioritise behaviourally relevant visual information while ignoring distraction. The neural networks supporting attention are modulated by two catecholamines, dopamine and noradrenaline. The current study investigated the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms in two catecholaminergic genes – COMT (Val158Met) and DBH (444 G/A) – on individual differences in attention functions. Participants (n = 125) were recruited from the Oxford Biobank by genotype-b...
7 CitationsSource
#1Nir Shalev (University of Oxford)H-Index: 7
#2Ann Steele (University of Manchester)H-Index: 5
Last. Gaia Scerif (University of Oxford)H-Index: 34
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Impaired sustained attention is considered an important factor in determining poor functional outcomes across multiple cognitive and behavioural disorders. Sustained attention is compromised for both children with Williams syndrome (WS) and Down's syndrome (DS), but specific difficulties remain poorly understood because of limitations in how sustained attention has been assessed thus far. In the current study, we compared the performance of typically developing children (N = 99), childr...
2 CitationsSource
#1Nir Shalev (University of Oxford)H-Index: 7
#2Anna-Katharina R. Bauer (University of Oxford)H-Index: 9
Last. Anna C. Nobre (University of Oxford)H-Index: 88
view all 3 authors...
Human performance fluctuates over time. Rather than random, the complex time course of variation reflects, among other factors, influences from regular periodic processes operating at multiple time scales. In this review, we consider evidence for how our performance ebbs and flows over fractions of seconds as we engage with sensory objects, over minutes as we perform tasks, and over hours according to homeostatic factors. We propose that rhythms of performance at these multiple tempos arise from...
5 CitationsSource