Claudia A. F. Wascher
Anglia Ruskin University
ExcretionSocial environmentDevelopmental psychologyStimulus (physiology)DemographyPsychologyCognitionCognitive psychologyAgonistic behaviourEcologyCarrionHeart ratePopulationAnser anserCarrion crowCommunicationParasite hostingSocial psychologyBiologyZoology
57Publications
14H-index
632Citations
Publications 52
Newest
#1Claudia A. F. Wascher (ARU: Anglia Ruskin University)H-Index: 14
#2Katie Allen (ARU: Anglia Ruskin University)
Last. Georgine SziplH-Index: 9
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Cognitive abilities allow animals to navigate through complex, fluctuating environments. In the present study, we tested performance of a captive group of eight crows, Corvus corone, and ten domestic chickens, Gallus gallus domesticus, in the cylinder task, as a test of motor inhibitory control, and reversal learning as a measure of learning ability and behavioural flexibility. Four crows and nine chickens completed the cylinder task, eight crows and six chickens completed the reversal learning ...
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How individuals interact with their environment and respond to changes is a key area of research in evolutionary biology. A physiological parameter that provides an instant proxy for the activation...
2 CitationsSource
#1Claudia A. F. Wascher (ARU: Anglia Ruskin University)H-Index: 14
#2Katie Allen (ARU: Anglia Ruskin University)
Last. Georgine Szipl (University of Vienna)H-Index: 9
view all 3 authors...
Cognitive abilities allow animals to navigate through complex, fluctuating environments. Examples include behavioural flexibility, which is the ability of an animal to alter their behaviour in response to a novel stimulus and behavioural inhibition, defined as the ability to control a response in order to choose a conflicting course of action. Behavioural flexibility and inhibitory control are expected to vary between and within species based on socio−ecological factors. In the present study we ...
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In group-living animals, the social environment is thought to affect the probability of parasite transmission. Here, I investigate relationships between social behaviour and gastrointestinal parasite product excretion in the carrion crow (Corvus corone). Individuals from a population of non-cooperatively breeding carrion crows excreted less samples containing coccidian oocysts when kept in larger groups (8 or 9 individuals) compared to those individuals kept in smaller groups (2 or 3 individuals...
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#1Claudia A. F. Wascher (ARU: Anglia Ruskin University)H-Index: 14
Last. Georgine Szipl (University of Vienna)H-Index: 9
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Cognitive abilities allow animals to navigate through complex, fluctuating environments. For example, behavioural flexibility, which is the ability of an animal to alter their behaviour in response to a novel stimulus or to modify responses to as familiar stimulus or behavioural inhibition, defined as the ability to control a response in order to choose a conflicting course of action. Behavioural flexibility and inhibitory control are expected to vary between and within species based on...
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#1Claudia A. F. Wascher (ARU: Anglia Ruskin University)H-Index: 14
#2Friederike Hillemann (University of Oxford)H-Index: 5
We report an observation of a female carrion crow, Corvus corone corone, mounting her long-term, pair-bonded, male partner. The report highlights the importance of more systematic quantitative studies of rare socio-sexual behaviours, which could provide important insights into the evolution of non-conceptive socio-sexual behaviours.
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#1Irene Susini (ARU: Anglia Ruskin University)H-Index: 1
#2Alexandra Safryghin (ARU: Anglia Ruskin University)H-Index: 2
Last. Claudia A. F. Wascher (ARU: Anglia Ruskin University)H-Index: 14
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The ability to regulate and withhold an immediate behaviour in pursuit of a more advantageous or valuable, albeit delayed, outcome is generally termed 9self-control9 and is regarded an important cognitive ability enabling adaptive decision-making in both social and asocial contexts. Abilities to cope with a delay in gratification have been investigated in a range of species using a variety of experimental paradigms. The present study attempts a first systematic analysis of available experimental...
4 CitationsSource
#1Claudia A. F. Wascher (ARU: Anglia Ruskin University)H-Index: 14
The social environment strongly affects the physiological stress response in group living animals, which in turn can affect the immune system and increase susceptibility to parasites. Here, I investigate relationships between social behaviour and gastrointestinal parasite product excretion in the carrion crow (Corvus corone). Crows kept in groups of eight or nine individuals, and higher-ranking individuals excreted less droppings containing coccidian oocysts compared to crows kept in pairs or tr...
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#1Valérie Dufour (François Rabelais University)H-Index: 2
#2Marie-Hélène Broihanne (EM Strasbourg Business School)H-Index: 8
Last. Claudia A. F. Wascher (ARU: Anglia Ruskin University)H-Index: 14
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In their natural environment, animals often make decisions crucial for survival, such as choosing the best patch or food, or the best partner to cooperate. The choice can be compared to a gamble with an outcome that is predictable but not certain, such as rolling a dice. In economics, such a situation is called a risky context. Several models show that although individuals can generally evaluate the odds of each potential outcome, they can be subject to errors of judgment or choose according to ...
2 CitationsSource
#1Claudia A. F. Wascher (ARU: Anglia Ruskin University)H-Index: 14
#2Béatrice FeiderH-Index: 1
Last. Valérie Dufour (François Rabelais University)H-Index: 2
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Human economic transactions are based on complex forms of reciprocity, which involve the capacities to share and to keep track of what was given and received over time. Animals too engage in reciprocal interactions but mechanisms, such as calculated reciprocity have only been shown experimentally in few species. Various forms of cooperation, e.g. food and information sharing, are frequently observed in corvids and they can engage in exchange interactions with human experimenters and accept delay...
5 CitationsSource