Daniel M. Oppenheimer
University of California, Los Angeles
Causal reasoningCausal modelMetacognitionHeuristicsDevelopmental psychologyArtificial intelligencePsychologyCognitionHeuristicCognitive psychologyWeightingCognitive scienceConstrual level theoryPerceptionFluencyProcessing fluencyMathematicsComputer sciencePriming (psychology)Reading (process)DiscountingSocial psychologyInformation processingCategorizationVerbal fluency test
67Publications
29H-index
6,617Citations
Publications 65
Newest
#1Pam Mueller (Princeton University)H-Index: 9
#2Daniel M. Oppenheimer (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 29
3 CitationsSource
#1Abigail B. Sussman (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 10
#2Daniel M. Oppenheimer (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 29
Last. Matthew M. LaMonaca (Princeton University)H-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
When forming a judgment about any unknown item, people must draw inferences from information that is already known. This paper examines causal relationships between cues as a relevant factor influencing how people determine the amount of weight to place on each piece of available evidence. We propose that people draw from their beliefs about specific causal relationships between cues when determining how much weight to place on those cues, and that understanding this process can help reconcile d...
3 CitationsSource
#1Daniel M. Oppenheimer (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 29
#2Franklin M. Zaromb (Princeton University)H-Index: 13
Last. Yoon Soo Park (UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago)H-Index: 19
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Abstract We examined persuasive and expository writing samples collected from more than 300 college students as part of a nine-year cross-sectional and longitudinal study of undergraduate writing performance, conducted between 2000 and 2008. Using newly developed scoring rubrics, longitudinal analyses of writing scores revealed statistically significant growth in writing performance over time. These findings held for both persuasive and expository writing. Although writing performance was better...
8 CitationsSource
#1Pam Mueller (Princeton University)H-Index: 9
#2Daniel M. Oppenheimer (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 29
Abstract To date, technological interventions in note-taking have been generally unsuccessful in improving performance. One reason for this lack of success may be that developers focus on making note-taking easier, while neglecting how the technologies could affect the other psychological processes underlying effective note-taking. Importantly, since note-taking serves different purposes in different situations, the effectiveness of various technologies will also be situationally dependent. In t...
16 CitationsSource
#1Keela S. ThomsonH-Index: 5
4 CitationsSource
#1Mary B. Hargis (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 4
#2Daniel M. Oppenheimer (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 29
Despite the fact that the population of is rapidly aging (Ortman et al., 2014), until recently scholars of charity have largely ignored older adults. Bjalkebring et al. (2016) begin addressing this gap in the literature. By showing that increasing age is associated with stronger feelings of sympathy and compassion and that older adults are more likely to report feeling positive emotions when making donations, Bjalkebring et al. (2016) connect the literature on age-related positivity biases to th...
3 CitationsSource
#1Marissa A. Sharif (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 2
#2Daniel M. Oppenheimer (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 29
Several models of judgment propose that people struggle with absolute judgments and instead represent options on the basis of their relative standing. This leads to a conundrum when people make judgments from memory: They may encode an option’s ordinal rank relative to the surrounding options but later observe a different distribution of options. Do people update their representations when making judgments from memory, or do they maintain their representations based on the initial encoding? In t...
4 CitationsSource
#1Keela S. Thomson (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 5
#2Daniel M. Oppenheimer (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 29
Much research in cognitive psychology has focused on the tendency to conserve limited cognitive resources. The CRT is the predominant measure of such miserly information processing, and also predicts a number of frequently studied decision-making traits (such as belief bias and need for cognition). However, many subjects from common subject populations have already been exposed to the questions, which might add considerable noise to data. Moreover, the CRT has been shown to be confounded with nu...
140 Citations
#1Sara Etchison (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 2
#2Daniel M. Oppenheimer (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 29
2 CitationsSource