Wouter van der Bijl
University of British Columbia
Sexual dimorphismIdentification (biology)Sexual selectionDomesticationAllometryPsychologyCognitionEthologyCognitive psychologyPredationEcologyVertebrateGuppyPopulationEcology (disciplines)Computer scienceMatingSex linkageBrain sizeEvolutionary biologyBiologyZoologyGenetic architecture
30Publications
9H-index
346Citations
Publications 28
Newest
#1Wouter van der Bijl (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 9
#2Judith E. Mank (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 50
Source
#1Benjamin A. Sandkam (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 11
#2Pedro Almeida (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 32
Last. Judith E. Mank (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 50
view all 9 authors...
Loss of recombination between sex chromosomes often depletes Y chromosomes of functional content and genetic variation, which might limit their potential to generate adaptive diversity. Males of the freshwater fish Poecilia parae occur as one of five discrete morphs, all of which shoal together in natural populations where morph frequency has been stable for over 50 years. Each morph uses a different complex reproductive strategy and morphs differ dramatically in colour, body size and mating beh...
4 CitationsSource
#1Jake Morris (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 6
#2Iulia Darolti (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 7
Last. Judith E. Mank (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 50
view all 4 authors...
Coloration plays a key role in the ecology of many species, influencing how an organism interacts with its environment, other species and conspecifics. Guppies are sexually dimorphic, with males displaying sexually selected coloration resulting from female preference. Previous work has suggested that much of guppy colour pattern variation is Y-linked. However, it remains unclear how many individual colour patterns are Y-linked in natural populations as much of the previous work has focused on ph...
2 CitationsSource
#1Wouter van der Bijl (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 9
#2Dirk Zeuss (University of Marburg)H-Index: 9
Last. Christopher W. Wheat (Stockholm University)H-Index: 31
view all 8 authors...
Sexual dimorphism is typically thought to result from sexual selection for elaborated male traits, as proposed by Darwin. However, natural selection could reduce expression of elaborated traits in females, as proposed by Wallace. Darwin and Wallace debated the origins of dichromatism in birds and butterflies, and although evidence in birds is roughly equal, if not in favor of Wallace's model, butterflies lack a similar scale of study. Here, we present a large-scale comparative phylogenetic analy...
5 CitationsSource
#1Jake Morris (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 6
#2Iulia Darolti (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 7
Last. Judith E. Mank (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 50
view all 4 authors...
Colouration plays a key role in the ecology of many species, influencing how an organism interacts with its environment, other species and conspecifics. Guppies are sexually dimorphic, with males displaying sexually selected colouration resulting from female preference. Previous work has suggested that much of guppy colour pattern variation is Y-linked. However, it remains unclear how many individual colour patterns are Y-linked in natural populations as much of the previous work has focused on ...
Source
#1Benjamin A. Sandkam (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 11
#2Pedro Almeida (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 32
Last. Judith E. Mank (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 50
view all 9 authors...
Abstract Sex chromosomes form once recombination is halted between the X and Y chromosomes. This loss of recombination quickly depletes Y chromosomes of functional content and genetic variation, which is thought to severely limit their potential to generate adaptive diversity. We examined Y diversity in Poecilia parae, where males occur as one of five discrete morphs, all of which shoal together in natural populations where morph frequency has been stable for over 50 years. Each morph utilizes d...
3 CitationsSource
#1Jake Morris (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 6
#2Iulia Darolti (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 7
Last. Judith E. Mank (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 50
view all 4 authors...
Colouration plays a key role in the ecology of many species, influencing how an organism interacts with its environment, other species and conspecifics. Guppies are sexually dimorphic, with males displaying sexually selected colouration resulting from female preference. Previous work has suggested that much of guppy colour pattern variation is Y-linked. However, it remains unclear how many individual colour patterns are Y-linked in natural populations as much of the previous work has focused on ...
Source
#1Christina Hansen Wheat (Stockholm University)H-Index: 2
#2Wouter van der Bijl (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 9
Last. Christopher W. Wheat (Stockholm University)H-Index: 31
view all 3 authors...
Domesticated animals display suites of altered morphological, behavioral, and physiological traits compared to their wild ancestors, a phenomenon known as the domestication syndrome (DS). Because these alterations are observed to co-occur across a wide range of present day domesticates, the traits within the DS are assumed to covary within species and a single developmental mechanism has been hypothesized to cause the observed co-occurrence. However, due to the lack of formal testing it is curre...
4 CitationsSource
#1Stephanie FongH-Index: 1
#2Björn RogellH-Index: 14
Last. Niclas KolmH-Index: 33
view all 7 authors...
The vertebrate brain displays enormous morphological variation and the quest to understand the evolutionary causes and consequences of this variation has spurred over a century of research. The mos ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Simon Eckerström-Liedholm (Stockholm University)H-Index: 3
#2Will Sowersby (Stockholm University)H-Index: 6
Last. Björn Rogell (Stockholm University)H-Index: 14
view all 7 authors...
: Species with fast life-histories typically prioritize current over future reproductive events, compared to species with slow life-histories. These species therefore require greater energetic input into reproduction, and also likely have less time to realize their reproductive potential. Hence, behaviors that increase access to both resources and mating opportunities, at a cost of increased mortality risk, could coevolve with the pace of life-history. However, whether this prediction holds acro...
4 CitationsSource