Valerie A. Thompson
University of Saskatchewan
EpistemologyMetacognitionSyllogismIntuitionPsychologyBelief biasCognitionDual process theoryProcess theoryCognitive psychologyCognitive scienceWorking memoryInferenceFluencyTask (project management)Computer scienceNormativeContrast (statistics)Social psychologyDeductive reasoningDUAL (cognitive architecture)
84Publications
33H-index
2,839Citations
Publications 88
Newest
#1Valerie A. Thompson (U of S: University of Saskatchewan)H-Index: 33
#2Henry Markovits (UQAM: Université du Québec à Montréal)H-Index: 32
Abstract null null The dual strategy model posits that reasoners rely on two information processing strategies when making inferences: The statistical strategy generates a rapid probabilistic estimate based on associative access to a wide array of information, and the counterexample strategy uses a more focused representation allowing for a search for potential counterexamples. In this paper, we focused on individual differences in strategy use as a predictor of performance on four reasoning tas...
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#1Sabina Kleitman (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 21
#2Dayna J. Fullerton (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 1
Last. Valerie A. Thompson (U of S: University of Saskatchewan)H-Index: 33
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How and why do people comply with protective behaviours during COVID-19? The emerging literature employs a variable-centered approach, typically using a narrow selection of constructs within a study. This study is the first to adopt a person-centred approach to identify complex patterns of compliance, and holistically examine underlying psychological differences, integrating multiple psychology paradigms and epidemiology. 1575 participants from Australia, US, UK, and Canada indicated their behav...
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#1Henry Markovits (UQAM: Université du Québec à Montréal)H-Index: 32
#2Pier-Luc de Chantal (UQAM: Université du Québec à Montréal)H-Index: 6
Last. Ian R. Newman (U of S: University of Saskatchewan)H-Index: 3
view all 6 authors...
The dual strategy model proposes that people use one of two potential ways of processing information when making inferences. The statistical strategy generates a rapid probabilistic estimate based on associative access to a wide array of information, while the counterexample strategy uses a more focused representation, allowing for a search for potential counterexamples. In the following studies, we explore the hypothesis that individual differences in strategy use are related to the ability to ...
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#1Valerie A. Thompson (U of S: University of Saskatchewan)H-Index: 33
Abstract This study tested the relationship between strategy use (assessed by eye-gaze patterns), cognitive ability (CA), and reasoning performance on a ratio-bias task. For the ratio-bias problems, participants (N = 125) chose which of two ratios was larger; each ratio was represented both as a fraction and as a picture. Problems were solved in two blocks: once under a deadline (Time1) and once in free time (Time2). Consistent with the assumption of dual process theories that CA is needed to ov...
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#1Matthieu T.S. Raoelison (University of Paris)H-Index: 4
#2Valerie A. Thompson (U of S: University of Saskatchewan)H-Index: 33
Last. Wim De Neys (University of Paris)H-Index: 36
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Cognitive capacity is commonly assumed to predict performance in classic reasoning tasks because people higher in cognitive capacity are believed to be better at deliberately correcting biasing erroneous intuitions. However, recent findings suggest that there can also be a positive correlation between cognitive capacity and correct intuitive thinking. Here we present results from 2 studies that directly contrasted whether cognitive capacity is more predictive of having correct intuition...
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#3Stephanie HowarthH-Index: 3
#4Ian R. NewmanH-Index: 3
Last. Valerie A. ThompsonH-Index: 33
view all 5 authors...
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#1Valerie A. ThompsonH-Index: 33
#2Ian R. NewmanH-Index: 3
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#1Pier-Luc de Chantal (UQAM: Université du Québec à Montréal)H-Index: 6
#2Ian R. Newman (U of S: University of Saskatchewan)H-Index: 3
Last. Henry Markovits (UQAM: Université du Québec à Montréal)H-Index: 32
view all 4 authors...
A common explanation for individual differences in the ability to draw rule-based inferences, when a putative conclusion suggests a competing belief-based inference, is that the ability to do so depends on working memory capacity. In the following studies, we examined the hypothesis that the ability to draw rule-based inferences in belief bias tasks can also be explained by individual differences in reasoning strategies and in the related attentional focus. The dual-strategy model differentiates...
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#1Selina Wang (U of S: University of Saskatchewan)H-Index: 1
#2Valerie A. Thompson (U of S: University of Saskatchewan)H-Index: 33
Feeling of Rightness (FOR) is a metacognitive experience accompanying people's intuitive answers that predicts the probability of subsequently changing answers (Thompson, Prowse Turner, & Pennycook, 2011). Previous research suggested FOR judgments are influenced by cues such as fluency, i.e., the ease with which an answer comes to mind. In the current paper, we examine the relationship between FOR, fluency, and answer changes; in particular, we were interested in whether answer fluency drives th...
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#1Gordon Pennycook (Yale University)H-Index: 47
#2Wim De Neys (Paris V: Paris Descartes University)H-Index: 36
Last. Valerie A. Thompson (U of S: University of Saskatchewan)H-Index: 33
view all 5 authors...
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