Lawrence B. Marks
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
CancerInternal medicineRadiologySurgeryOncologyMedical physicsRadiation treatment planningLung cancerChemotherapyLungPneumonitisSingle-photon emission computed tomographyNuclear medicineRadiation oncologyLung injuryIn patientRadiation therapyBreast cancerMedicineDosimetry
763Publications
91H-index
23.8kCitations
Publications 768
Newest
#1David V. Fried (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 16
#2Shiva K. Das (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 36
Last. B.S. Chera (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 6
view all 4 authors...
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE(S) Xerostomia and dysgeusia are two common and severe complications for patients undergoing head and neck chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Literature suggests a relationship between mean oral cavity (OC) doses and worsening xerostomia and dysgeusia. However, limited data exists identifying which substructures of the oral cavity are most related to patient reported outcomes (PROs) or how oral cavity dosimetry should be prioritized in relationship to other salivary glands during planning...
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#1David V. Fried (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 16
#2Tong Zhu (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 19
Last. B.S. Chera (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 6
view all 7 authors...
Purpose/objective(s) null Literature suggests that salivary gland stem cells, capable of regenerating salivary tissue, may preferentially reside in the large ducts of salivary glands. We conducted a prospective trial in patients receiving definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for oropharyngeal cancer where we preferentially spared the major parotid ducts (localized via MRI sialography) during treatment planning. We hypothesized that (1) this technique would yield improvements in patient reported xe...
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#1Karthik Adapa (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 3
#2Shiva K. Das (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 36
Last. Lukasz M. Mazur (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 15
view all 8 authors...
Purpose/Objective(s) null The majority of errors during radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning and associated quality assurance (QA) processes are ascribed to ‘human error’. Most centers typically use in-house QA checklists but without formal human factors engineering evaluations. We herein comprehensively evaluate the perceived usability of a dosimetry-QA checklist and associated cognitive workload, performance, and patient safety in real clinical settings at an academic medical center. null...
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#1David V. Fried (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 16
#2Shiva K. Das (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 36
Last. B.S. Chera (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 6
view all 6 authors...
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE(S) IMRT planning is challenging, at least in part, due to the essentially-infinite number of possibilities, and since the planner is never sure that they have gotten "the best", or at least "nearly the best" achievable plan. We prospectively assessed the impact of providing IMRT planners with a priori knowledge of the maximum achievable dose sparing for organs at risk (OARs) for patients on both dosimetric and clinical endpoints. We hypothesized that a priori knowledge of maxim...
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#1J. Hall (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
#2David V. Fried (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 16
Last. Y. Ogunleye (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
view all 11 authors...
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE(S) Approximately 30% of women who receive post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in the setting of breast reconstruction suffer from reconstruction complications. This study aims to assess clinical and dosimetric factors associated with the risk of reconstruction complications after PMRT, with the ultimate goal of identifying a dosimetric constraint that can be utilized clinically to limit this risk. MATERIALS/METHODS We retrospectively identified 41 patients who underwent mo...
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PURPOSE Heart dose and heart disease increase the risk for cardiac toxicity associated with radiation therapy. We hypothesized that computed tomography (CT) coronary calcifications are associated with cardiac toxicity and may help ascertain baseline heart disease. METHODS AND MATERIALS We analyzed the cumulative incidence of cardiac events in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer receiving median 74 Gy on prospective dose-escalation trials. Events were defined as symptomatic effusio...
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#1L Rankine (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 12
#2Ziyi Wang (Duke University)H-Index: 7
Last. Shiva K. Das (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 36
view all 7 authors...
PURPOSE To present a methodology to use pulmonary gas exchange maps to guide functional avoidance treatment planning in radiation therapy (RT) and evaluate its efficacy compared with ventilation-guided treatment planning. METHODS AND MATERIALS Before receiving conventional RT for non-small cell lung cancer, 11 patients underwent hyperpolarized 129Xe gas exchange magnetic resonance imaging to map the distribution of xenon in its gas phase (ventilation) and transiently bound to red blood cells in ...
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#1Vitali Moiseenko (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 33
#2Jona A. Hattangadi-Gluth (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 23
Last. Issam El NaqaH-Index: 60
view all 10 authors...
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