Jin-Ran Chen
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
OffspringBone cellEndocrinologyCellular differentiationBone remodelingChemistryOsteoclastOsteoporosisEstrogenOsteoblastBone densityRANKLBone marrowBone growthSenescenceMAPK/ERK pathwayBone resorptionMedicineBiologyCell biology
59Publications
26H-index
2,384Citations
Publications 57
Newest
#1Dongzheng Gai (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)
#2James P. Stewart (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 7
Last. Fenghuang Zhan (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 49
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#1Jin-Ran Chen (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 26
#2Oxana P. Lazarenko (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 18
Last. Martin J. J. Ronis (LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans)H-Index: 48
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#1Jin-Ran Chen (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 26
#2Oxana P. Lazarenko (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 18
Last. Elisabet Børsheim (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 26
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#1Jin-Ran Chen (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 26
#2Haijun Zhao (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 12
Last. Kartik Shankar (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 43
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Nutritional status during intrauterine and/or early postnatal life has substantial influence on adult offspring health. Along these lines, there is a growing body of evidence illustrating that high fat diet (HFD)-induced maternal obesity can regulate fetal bone development. Thus, we investigated the effects of maternal obesity on both fetal skeletal development and mechanisms linking maternal obesity to osteoblast differentiation in offspring. Embryonic osteogenic calvarial cells (EOCCs) were is...
1 CitationsSource
#1Haijun Zhao (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 12
#2Oxana P. Lazarenko (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 18
Last. Jin-Ran Chen (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 26
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: Nutritional factors influence bone development. Previous studies demonstrated that bone mass significantly increased with suppressed bone resorption in early life of rats fed with AIN-93G semi-purified diets supplemented with 10% whole blueberry (BB) powder for 2 weeks. However, the effects of increased phenolic acids in animal serum due to this diet on bone and bone resorption were unclear. This in vitro and in ex vivo study examined the effects of phenolic hippuric acid (HA) and 3-(3-hydroxy...
2 CitationsSource
#1Jin-Ran Chen (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 26
#2Umesh D. Wankhade (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 12
Last. Oxana P. Lazarenko (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 18
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: Phenolic acids (PAs) are metabolites derived from polyphenolic compounds found in fruits and vegetables resulting from the actions of gut bacteria. Previously, we reported that the levels of seven individual PAs were found to be at least 10 times higher in the serum of rats fed a blueberry (BB)-containing diet compared to those fed a control diet. We have characterized the effects of one such BB-associated serum PA, 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-propionic acid (PPA), on senescence signaling and promotio...
2 CitationsSource
#1Umesh D. WankhadeH-Index: 12
#2Ying ZhongH-Index: 12
Last. Kartik ShankarH-Index: 43
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The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of blueberries improve vascular function and insulin sensitivity. However, the bioavailability of the active compounds in blueberries is largely dependent on the gut microbiota, which may themselves be altered by blueberry components. The objective of the current study was to explore a possible sex-dependent modulation of the gut microbiota following supplementation with blueberries in adult mice. Eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice (n = 7–10/group) were...
11 CitationsSource
#1Jin-Ran Chen (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 26
#2Oxana P. Lazarenko (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences)H-Index: 18
Last. Kartik ShankarH-Index: 43
view all 5 authors...
: Intrauterine or early postnatal high-fat diet (HFD) has substantial influences on adult offspring health; however, studies of HFD-induced maternal obesity on regulation of adult offspring bone formation are sparse. Here, we investigated the effects of HFD-induced maternal obesity on both fetal and adult offspring skeletal development. We found that HFD-induced maternal obesity significantly decreased fetal skeletal development, but enhanced fetal osteoblastic cell senescence signaling and sign...
13 CitationsSource
#1Jin-Ran ChenH-Index: 26
#2Oxana P. LazarenkoH-Index: 18
Last. Kartik ShankarH-Index: 43
view all 4 authors...
Nutritional status during intrauterine and early postnatal life impacts the risk of chronic diseases; however, evidence for an association between early-life dietary factors and bone health in adul...
10 CitationsSource
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