Jeremy P. Jamieson
University of Rochester
Biopsychosocial modelDevelopmental psychologyPsychologySocial stressCognitionCognitive psychologyStress (linguistics)PsychophysiologyPerceptionPsychological interventionStereotype threatReactivity (psychology)ConversationCognitive appraisalPsycINFOContext (language use)Competition (economics)ArousalAffect (psychology)Stress managementAnxietyClinical psychologyCoping (psychology)Social psychologyInterpersonal relationshipModeration
62Publications
19H-index
1,856Citations
Publications 59
Newest
The field experiment presented here applied a stress regulation technique to optimize affective and neuroendocrine responses and improve academic and psychological outcomes in an evaluative academic context. Community college students (N = 339) were randomly assigned to stress reappraisal or active control conditions immediately before taking their second in-class exam. Whereas stress is typically perceived as having negative effects, stress reappraisal informs individuals about the functional b...
1 CitationsSource
#1David S. YeagerH-Index: 35
Last. Jeremy P. JamiesonH-Index: 19
view all 9 authors...
Social stress poses a major threat to adolescent health via its effects on internalizing symptoms, such as anxiety and depression. Available interventions to help adolescents improve their stress responses, however, have not been effective in rigorous evaluation studies, or they have been difficult to administer widely. Here we show that replicable improvements in adolescent stress responses can be achieved with a short (~30-minute), scalable synergistic mindsets intervention. This intervention,...
Source
#1Jonathan Gordils (UHart: University of Hartford)
#1Jonathan Gordils (UHart: University of Hartford)H-Index: 1
Last. Jeremy P. Jamieson (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 19
view all 4 authors...
This research examined the effects of the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic on perceived Black-White intergroup competition and negative intergroup psychological outcomes. Two datasets (collected before [2018] and after the onset of [April, 2020] COVID-19) were combined (N = 2,131) for this research. The data provided support for the hypothesis that perceptions of Black-White intergroup competition, and subsequently perceptions of discrimination, behavioral avoidance, intergroup anxiety, and interr...
2 CitationsSource
#1Eunjin Seo (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 6
#2Hae Yeon Lee (Stanford University)H-Index: 6
Last. David S. Yeager (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 35
view all 7 authors...
Adolescents who hold an entity theory of personality - the belief that people cannot change - are more likely to report internalizing symptoms during the socially stressful transition to high school. It has been puzzling, however, why a cognitive belief about the potential for change predicts symptoms of an affective disorder. The present research integrated three models - implicit theories, hopelessness theories of depression, and the biopsychosocial model of challenge and threat - to shed ligh...
2 CitationsSource
#1Jonathan Gordils (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 2
#2Andrew J. Elliot (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 109
Last. Jeremy P. Jamieson (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 19
view all 3 authors...
There remains a dearth of research on causal roles of perceived interracial competition on psychological outcomes. Towards this end, this research experimentally manipulated perceptions of group-level competition between Black and White individuals in the U.S. and tested for effects on negative psychological outcomes. In Study 1 (N = 899), participants assigned to the high interracial competition condition (HRC) reported perceiving more discrimination, behavioral avoidance, intergroup anxiety, a...
2 CitationsSource
#1Jonathan Gordils (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 2
#2Jeremy P. Jamieson (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 19
Social interactions involving personal disclosures are ubiquitous in social life and have important relational implications. A large body of research has documented positive outcomes from fruitful ...
Source
#1Hae Yeon Lee (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 6
#2Jeremy P. Jamieson (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 19
Last. David S. Yeager (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 35
view all 8 authors...
Three studies examined the effects of receiving fewer signs of positive feedback than others on social media. In Study 1, adolescents (N = 613, Mage = 14.3 years) who were randomly assigned to receive few (vs. many) likes during a standardized social media interaction felt more strongly rejected, and reported more negative affect and more negative thoughts about themselves. In Study 2 (N = 145), negative responses to receiving fewer likes were associated with greater depressive symptoms reported...
2 CitationsSource
1 CitationsSource
#1Yuthika U. Girme (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 10
#2Brett J. Peters (OU: Ohio University)H-Index: 9
Last. Matthew J. Sigal (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 1
view all 8 authors...
Suppressing the expression of negative emotions tends to undermine individuals' and their partners' wellbeing. However, sometimes expressive suppression may be relatively innocuous given that individuals commonly withhold negative emotions in order to maintain close relationships, and this may be especially the case when expressive suppression is enacted by people who exhibit amplified expressions of negative emotions, such as those high in attachment anxiety. The current research examined when ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Samantha Joel (UWO: University of Western Ontario)H-Index: 16
#2Paul W. Eastwick (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 29
Last. Scott T. Wolf (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 9
view all 86 authors...
Given the powerful implications of relationship quality for health and well-being, a central mission of relationship science is explaining why some romantic relationships thrive more than others. This large-scale project used machine learning (i.e., Random Forests) to 1) quantify the extent to which relationship quality is predictable and 2) identify which constructs reliably predict relationship quality. Across 43 dyadic longitudinal datasets from 29 laboratories, the top relationship-specific ...
21 CitationsSource