Roger B. Hammer
Oregon State University
Physical geographyEnvironmental resource managementBiodiversityLand tenureDemographyVegetationEcologyGeographyWildland–urban interfaceLand coverPopulationNatural resourceLand useUrban sprawlEconomic growthCensusEnvironmental protectionPopulation growthLandscape ecologyFire regimeEnvironmental planningForestry
64Publications
28H-index
4,116Citations
Publications 61
Newest
#1Miranda H. Mockrin (USFS: United States Forest Service)H-Index: 17
#2Dexter H. LockeH-Index: 18
Last. Volker C. Radeloff (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 86
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Residential development is one of the most intensive and widespread land uses in the United States, with substantial environmental impacts, including changes in forest cover. However, the relationships between forest cover and residential development are complex. Contemporary forest cover reflects multiple factors, including housing density, time since development, historical land cover, and land management since development. We investigated how forest cover varies with housing density,...
Source
#1Miranda H. Mockrin (USFS: United States Forest Service)H-Index: 17
#2Susan I. Stewart (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 33
Last. Volker C. Radeloff (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 86
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Public lands are typically established in recognition of their unique ecological value, yet both ecological and social values of public lands change over time, along with human distribution and land use. These transformations are evident even in developed countries with long histories of public land management, such as the United States. The 20th Century saw dramatic changes in the American population, in distribution and in racial and ethnic diversity, leading to new challenges and new...
Source
#1Anna M. PidgeonH-Index: 34
#2Curtis H. FlatherH-Index: 44
Last. Roger B. HammerH-Index: 28
view all 8 authors...
#1Miranda H. Mockrin (USFS: United States Forest Service)H-Index: 17
#2Susan I. Stewart (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 33
Last. Roger B. Hammer (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 28
view all 4 authors...
Following the loss of homes to wildfire, when risk has been made apparent, homeowners must decide whether to rebuild, and choose materials and vegetation, while local governments guide recovery and rebuilding. As wildfires are smaller and more localised than other disasters, it is unclear if recovery after wildfire results in policy change and adaptation, decreasing assets at risk, or if recovery encourages reinvestment in hazard-prone areas. We studied three wildfires on the Colorado Front Rang...
Source
#1Gabriel Wigtil (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 1
#2Roger B. Hammer (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 28
Last. Volker C. Radeloff (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 86
view all 7 authors...
The hazards-of-place model posits that vulnerability to environmental hazards depends on both biophysical and social factors. Biophysical factors determine where wildfire potential is elevated, whereas social factors determine where and how people are affected by wildfire. We evaluated place vulnerability to wildfire hazards in the coterminous US. We developed a social vulnerability index using principal component analysis and evaluated it against existing measures of wildfire potential and wild...
Source
#1Miranda H. MockrinH-Index: 17
#2Susan I. Stewart (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 33
Last. Patricia M. Alexandre (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 5
view all 5 authors...
Wildfire management now emphasizes fire-adapted communities that coexist with wildfires, although it is unclear how communities will progress to this goal. Hazards research suggests that response to wildfire—specifically, rebuilding after fire—may be a crucial opportunity for homeowner and community adaptation. We explore rebuilding after the 2010 Fourmile Canyon Fire from Boulder, CO, that destroyed 165 homes, to better understand individual and community adaptation after wildfire. We examined ...
Source
#1Patricia M. Alexandre (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 5
#2Miranda H. Mockrin (USFS: United States Forest Service)H-Index: 17
Last. Volker C. Radeloff (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 86
view all 5 authors...
The number of wildland-urban interface communities affected by wildfire is increasing, and both wildfire suppressionandlossesare costly.However, littleisknownaboutpost-wildfireresponsebyhomeowners andcommunities after buildings are lost. Our goal was to characterise rebuilding and new development after wildfires across the conterminous United States. We analysed all wildfires in the conterminous USA from 2000 to 2005. We mapped 42724 buildings, of which 34836 were present before the fire and sur...
Source
#2Susan I. StewartH-Index: 33
Last. Volker C. RadeloffH-Index: 86
view all 6 authors...
The wildland-urban interface (WUI) is the area where structures and other human development meet or intermingle with undeveloped wildland, and it is where wildfires have their greatest impacts on people. Hence the WUI is important for wildfire management. This document and associated maps summarize the extent of the WUI in the conterminous United States in 2010. The maps and summary statistics are designed to inform both national policy and local land management concerning the WUI. The data pres...
Source
#1Anna M. Pidgeon (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 34
#2Curtis H. Flather (USFS: United States Forest Service)H-Index: 44
Last. Roger B. Hammer (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 28
view all 8 authors...
As people encroach increasingly on natural areas, one question is how this affects avian biodi- versity. The answer to this is partly scale-dependent. At broad scales, human populations and biodiversity concentrate in the same areas and are positively associated, but at local scales people and biodiversity are negatively associated with biodiversity. We investigated whether there is also a systematic temporal trend in the relationship between bird biodiversity and housing development. We used li...
Source
#1Thomas A. SpiesH-Index: 6
#2Eric M. WhiteH-Index: 18
Last. Roger B. HammerH-Index: 28
view all 14 authors...
Fire-prone landscapes are not well studied as coupled human and natural systems (CHANS) and present many challenges for understanding and promoting adaptive behaviors and institutions. Here, we explore how heterogeneity, feedbacks, and external drivers in this type of natural hazard system can lead to complexity and can limit the development of more adaptive approaches to policy and management. Institutions and social networks can counter these limitations and promote adaptation. We also develop...
Source
This website uses cookies.
We use cookies to improve your online experience. By continuing to use our website we assume you agree to the placement of these cookies.
To learn more, you can find in our Privacy Policy.