Mathew Peter
Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre
Composite numberSelf-healing hydrogelsRadical polymerizationBiophysicsCeramicGene deliveryMatrix (mathematics)Green fluorescent proteinCellNanoparticleComposite material3D cell cultureHEK 293 cellsChemistryPolymer chemistryMaterials scienceIn vitroIn vivoEx vivoBiocompatibilityEthylene glycolBiomaterialBioactive glassSwellingGelatinCarbohydratePeptideChitosanAcrylatePhotoinitiatorCharacterization (materials science)ChitinExtracellularSemi syntheticChemical engineeringBiodegradable polymerTissue engineeringPolymerAdhesiveDynamic mechanical analysisCell adhesionProtein adsorptionScaffoldNanocompositeCell biology
10Publications
5H-index
756Citations
Publications 9
Newest
#1Mathew PeterH-Index: 5
#2Nitya GaneshH-Index: 4
Last. Rangasamy Jayakumar (AIMS: Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre)H-Index: 79
view all 7 authors...
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#1Mathew Peter (IITB: Indian Institute of Technology Bombay)H-Index: 5
#2Archana Singh (IITB: Indian Institute of Technology Bombay)H-Index: 3
Last. Prakriti Tayalia (IITB: Indian Institute of Technology Bombay)H-Index: 13
view all 7 authors...
Hydrogels have been used as synthetic mimics of 3D extracellular matrices (ECM) and their physical properties like stiffness, degradability, and porosity have been known to influence the behavior of encapsulated cells. However, to understand the role of individual properties, the influence of biophysical cues should be decoupled from biochemical ones. In this study, we have used hydrogels as a tunable model matrix to develop a 3D cell culture platform for studying cell invasion. Inert polyethyle...
4 CitationsSource
#1Paresh Shrimali (IITB: Indian Institute of Technology Bombay)H-Index: 2
#2Mathew Peter (IITB: Indian Institute of Technology Bombay)H-Index: 5
Last. Prakriti Tayalia (IITB: Indian Institute of Technology Bombay)H-Index: 13
view all 7 authors...
For diseases related to genetic disorders or cancer, many cellular therapies rely on the ex vivo modification of cells for attaining a desired therapeutic effect. The efficacy of such therapies involving the genetic modification of cells relies on the extent of gene expression and subsequent persistence of modified cells when infused into the patient's body. In situ gene delivery implies the manipulation of cells in their in vivo niche such that the effectiveness can be improved by minimizing po...
6 CitationsSource
#1Mathew Peter (IITB: Indian Institute of Technology Bombay)H-Index: 5
#2Prakriti Tayalia (IITB: Indian Institute of Technology Bombay)H-Index: 13
This work demonstrates the feasibility of patterning a poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel with a cell adhesive ligand that was functionalized with an acrylate group using Michael type addition instead of activated N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (NHS) ester based chemistry. We synthesized PEGDA from PEG molecules and made PEGDA hydrogels via free radical polymerization in the presence of UV light and photoinitiator. Mechanical and physical properties of the hydrogel could be tuned by ch...
19 CitationsSource
Source
#1Mathew Peter (AIMS: Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre)H-Index: 5
#2Nitya Ganesh (AIMS: Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre)H-Index: 4
Last. Rangasamy Jayakumar (AIMS: Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre)H-Index: 79
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Chitosan is a novel biocompatible, biodegradable polymer for potential use in tissue engineering. In this work, chitosan–gelatin/nanophase hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds were prepared by blending chitosan and gelatin with nanophase hydroxyapatite (nHA). The prepared nHA was characterized using TEM, XRD and FT-IR. The prepared composite scaffolds were characterized using SEM, FT-IR and XRD studies. The composite scaffolds were highly porous with a pore size of 150–300 μm. In addition...
255 CitationsSource
#1Mathew Peter (AIMS: Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre)H-Index: 5
#2N.S. Binulal (AIMS: Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre)H-Index: 10
Last. Rangasamy Jayakumar (AIMS: Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre)H-Index: 79
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Bioactive glass ceramic nanoparticles (nBGC) were synthesized by sol–gel process and characterized using FTIR, TEM and XRD. Composite scaffolds of chitosan (CS)–gelatin (CG) with nBGC were prepared by blending of chitosan and gelatin with nBGC. The prepared CG/nBGC nano-composite scaffolds were characterized using FTIR, SEM and XRD. The effect of nBGC in the scaffold matrix was evaluated in terms of scaffold properties and biocompatibility. Our results showed macroporous internal morpho...
260 CitationsSource
#1Mathew Peter (AIMS: Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre)H-Index: 5
#2N.S. Binulal (AIMS: Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre)H-Index: 10
Last. Rangasamy Jayakumar (AIMS: Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre)H-Index: 79
view all 7 authors...
Abstract A novel nanocomposite scaffold of chitosan (CS) and bioactive glass ceramic nanoparticles (nBGC) was prepared by blending nBGC with chitosan solution followed by lyophilization technique. The particle size of the prepared nBGC was found to be 100 nm. The prepared composite scaffolds were characterized using techniques such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The SEM studies showed that the bioactive nBGC wer...
133 CitationsSource
#1Mathew Peter (AIMS: Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre)H-Index: 5
#2Pandian Thodi Sudheesh Kumar (AIMS: Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre)H-Index: 1
Last. Rangasamy Jayakumar (AIMS: Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre)H-Index: 79
view all 6 authors...
Bioactive glass ceramic nanoparticles (nBGC) were prepared by sol–gel technique. The novel chitin/nBGC composite scaffolds were prepared using chitin gel with nBGC by lyophilization technique. The prepared nBGC and composite scaffolds were characterized using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The composite scaffolds showed adequate porosity where the nBGC nanoparticles were ho...
87 CitationsSource