Melissa J. Green
University of New South Wales
Child developmentPsychiatryDevelopmental psychologyPsychologyNeuroscienceCognitionCognitive psychologyBipolar disorderSchizophrenia (object-oriented programming)Mental illnessEarly childhoodSchizotypyPsychosisPopulationClinical psychologyMedicineCohortSchizophreniaSocial cognitionBiology
244Publications
52H-index
6,739Citations
Publications 246
Newest
#1Oliver J. Watkeys (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 6
#2Kimberlie Dean (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 28
Last. Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 52
view all 6 authors...
OBJECTIVE To identify classes of children exposed to distinct clusters of perinatal and familial risk factors at the time of birth, and examine relationships between class membership and a variety of adverse outcomes in childhood. DESIGN A prospective longitudinal study of children (and their parents) born between 2002 and 2004 and who have been followed-up until 12-13 years of age. A combination of latent class analysis and logistic regression analyses were used. RESULTS Adverse developmental, ...
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#1Kristin R. Laurens (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 40
#2Kimberlie Dean (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 28
Last. Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 52
view all 10 authors...
Abstract null null Out-of-school suspension is associated with adverse educational, justice, health, and welfare outcomes. Little research has focussed on suspensions from primary (elementary) school, despite early exclusions representing high-risk events for poor outcomes. This study aimed to identify early life predictors of primary school suspensions in a sample of 34,855 Australian children using linked education, health, child protection, and justice records for children and their parents. ...
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#1Matthias Kirschner (UZH: University of Zurich)H-Index: 17
#2Benazir Hodzic-Santor (Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital)H-Index: 4
Last. Aurina Arnatkeviciute (Monash University)H-Index: 8
view all 66 authors...
Neuroanatomical abnormalities have been reported along a continuum from at-risk stages, including high schizotypy, to early and chronic psychosis. However, a comprehensive neuroanatomical mapping of schizotypy remains to be established. The authors conducted the first large-scale meta-analyses of cortical and subcortical morphometric patterns of schizotypy in healthy individuals, and compared these patterns with neuroanatomical abnormalities observed in major psychiatric disorders. The sample co...
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#1Yann Quidé (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 17
#2Emiliana Tonini (UNSW: University of New South Wales)
Last. Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 52
view all 5 authors...
BACKGROUND Childhood trauma confers risk for psychosis and is associated with increased 'schizotypy' (a multi-dimensional construct reflecting risk for psychosis in the general population). Structural brain alterations are associated with both childhood trauma and schizotypy, but the potential role of trauma exposure in moderating associations between schizotypy and brain morphology has yet to be determined. METHODS Participants were 160 healthy individuals (mean age: 40.08 years, SD = 13.64, ra...
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#1Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 52
#2Oliver J. Watkeys (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 6
Last. Vaughan J. Carr (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 76
view all 9 authors...
Abstract null null Early life exposure to infectious diseases confers risk for adult psychiatric disorders but relatively few human population studies have examined associations with childhood mental disorder. Here we examined the effects of exposure to maternal infection during pregnancy, and child infectious diseases in early childhood (birth to age 4 years), in relation to first mental disorder diagnosis (age 5–13 years). The study sample comprised 71,841 children represented in a population ...
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#1Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 52
#2Patrycja J Piotroswka (Coventry University)
Last. Vaughan J. Carr (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 76
view all 9 authors...
The processes facilitating resilience are likely to be influenced by individual, familial and contextual factors that are dynamic across the life-course. These factors have been less studied in rel...
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#1Niamh Mullins (ISMMS: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)H-Index: 18
#2Jooeun Kang (VUMC: Vanderbilt University Medical Center)H-Index: 8
Last. Anna StarnawskaH-Index: 13
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Abstract null null Background null Suicide is a leading cause of death worldwide, and non-fatal suicide attempts, which occur far more frequently, are a major source of disability and social and economic burden. Both have substantial genetic etiology, which is partially shared and partially distinct from that of related psychiatric disorders. null null null Methods null We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 29,782 suicide attempt (SA) cases and 519,961 controls in the Internatio...
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#1Yann Quidé (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 17
#2Leah Girshkin (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 6
Last. Melissa J. Green (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 52
view all 5 authors...
Childhood trauma is a risk factor for psychotic and mood disorders that is associated with abnormal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function in response to stress and abnormal social brain function. Here, we aimed to determine whether childhood trauma exposure would differently moderate associations between cortisol reactivity and social brain function, among cases with schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BD) and in healthy individuals (HC). Forty cases with SZ, 35 with BD and 34 HCs...
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