Gillian C. Barnett
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Genome-wide association studyCancerInternal medicineRadiologySurgeryPathologyOncologySingle-nucleotide polymorphismOdds ratioRadiogenomicsRandomized controlled trialGenetic associationMedical physicsHead and neck cancerProstate cancerCosmesisToxicityLate toxicityRadiation therapyBreast cancerBioinformaticsMedicineBiologyMeta-analysis
67Publications
27H-index
2,555Citations
Publications 67
Newest
#1Finbar Slevin (Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust)H-Index: 2
#2Shermaine PanH-Index: 1
Last. Gillian C. Barnett (Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust)H-Index: 27
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Abstract null null Aims null Sinonasal malignancies are rare; the most common histological subtype is squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). No randomised trial data exist to guide treatment decisions, with options including surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The role and sequence of a primary non-surgical approach in this disease remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to present treatment outcomes for a multicentre population of patients with locally advanced, stage IVa/b sinonasal SCC treat...
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#1Shermaine PanH-Index: 1
#2Finbar SlevinH-Index: 2
Last. David J ThomsonH-Index: 11
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#1D.J. NobleH-Index: 6
#2K. HarrisonH-Index: 91
Last. Rajesh JenaH-Index: 17
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#1Tim Rattay (University of Leicester)H-Index: 9
#2Petra Seibold (DKFZ: German Cancer Research Center)H-Index: 27
Last. Sheryl GreenH-Index: 18
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Background: Acute skin toxicity is a common and usually transient side-effect of breast radiotherapy although, if sufficiently severe, it can affect breast cosmesis, aftercare costs and the patient's quality-of-life. The aim of this study was to develop predictive models for acute skin toxicity using published risk factors and externally validate the models in patients recruited into the prospective multi-center REQUITE (validating pREdictive models and biomarkers of radiotherapy toxicity to red...
1 CitationsSource
#1Sarah L. Kerns (URMC: University of Rochester Medical Center)H-Index: 27
#2Laura FachalH-Index: 24
Last. Catharine M L West (MAHSC: Manchester Academic Health Science Centre)H-Index: 77
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BACKGROUND: 10-20% of patients develop long-term toxicity following radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Identification of common genetic variants associated with susceptibility to radiotoxicity might improve risk prediction and inform functional mechanistic studies. METHODS: We conducted an individual patient data meta-analysis of six genome-wide association studies (n = 3,871) in men with European ancestry who underwent radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Radiotoxicities (increased urinary frequenc...
27 CitationsSource
#1Neil G. Burnet (MAHSC: Manchester Academic Health Science Centre)H-Index: 50
#2Gillian C. Barnett (Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust)H-Index: 27
Last. Catharine M L West (MAHSC: Manchester Academic Health Science Centre)H-Index: 77
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6 CitationsSource
#1M Brothwell (Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust)H-Index: 1
#2Catharine M L West (MAHSC: Manchester Academic Health Science Centre)H-Index: 77
Last. Gillian C. Barnett (Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust)H-Index: 27
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Abstract Most radiogenomics studies investigate how genetic variation can help to explain the differences in early and late radiotherapy toxicity between individuals. The field of radiogenomics in photon beam therapy has grown rapidly in recent years, carving out a unique translational discipline, which has progressed from candidate gene studies to larger scale genome-wide association studies, meta-analyses and now prospective validation studies. Genotyping is increasingly sophisticated and affo...
5 CitationsSource
#1Catharine M L WestH-Index: 77
#2Sarah L. KernsH-Index: 27
Last. Barry S. RosensteinH-Index: 34
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