Celia Thompson
University of Melbourne
Academic writingHigher educationWeb 2.0World Wide WebSociologyMathematics educationPsychologyPedagogyEnglish for academic purposesIdentity (social science)Academic integrityContext (language use)IntertextualityComputer scienceLinguisticsSocial webSocial mediaDisciplineTeaching methodPolitics
34Publications
12H-index
524Citations
Publications 33
Newest
#1Lucy Davidson (University of Melbourne)
#2Cathie Elder (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 8
Last. Celia Thompson (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 12
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#1Khatmah AlanaziH-Index: 1
#2Celia ThompsonH-Index: 12
Teachers’ beliefs play a key role in their selection of language teaching methodologies; they affect teachers’ pedagogical practices and behaviours and are consequently integral in shaping the language learning classroom environment. This study investigated the beliefs of teachers of English as a foreign language (EFL) in relation to the concept of ‘language socialisation’ (LS) and its pedagogical application through the use of social networking technologies (SNTs) in a Saudi university language...
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#1Tim McNamara (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 37
#2Janne Morton (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 12
Last. Celia Thompson (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 12
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ABSTRACTThis article addresses the suitability of the CEFR as the basis for decisions about the readiness of individuals to engage in academic writing tasks in undergraduate university courses, and as a guide to progress. The CEFR offers potentially relevant general scales and subscales, but also more specific subscales for writing in the academic context. However, recent challenges to traditional views of academic writing have potential implications for assessment frameworks such as the CEFR wh...
1 CitationsSource
#1Jenny Waycott (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 26
#2Celia Thompson (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 12
Last. Rosemary Anne Clerehan (Monash University)H-Index: 17
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Abstract It has become commonplace in higher education for instructors to use social technologies to motivate and challenge their students and to support learning objectives. In some instances, social technologies are used to make students' assessable work visible to other people, such as peers and external audiences. This study investigates university students' responses to the requirement to make their assessable work visible online to others. Using the lens of the community of practice framew...
13 CitationsSource
#1Neda Chepinchikj (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 2
#2Celia Thompson (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 12
Abstract The following paper examines how a conversation analysis (CA) approach to the investigation of spoken dialogue can be applied to analysis of the verbal and non-verbal (prosodic and paralinguistic) features of film discourse. In doing so, we wish to make a valuable contribution to the debate in the field between ‘pure’ (see Schegloff, 1988 ; Emmison, 1993 ) and ‘applied’ CA scholars (e.g. ten Have, 2007 ). Researchers belonging to the former grouping argue that CA should only be used to ...
7 CitationsSource
#1Neomy StorchH-Index: 36
#2Janne MortonH-Index: 12
Last. Celia ThompsonH-Index: 12
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3 CitationsSource
#1Celia Thompson (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 12
#2Janne MortonH-Index: 12
Last. Neomy StorchH-Index: 36
view all 3 authors...
The need to establish an authorial identity in academic discourse has been considered to be critical for all doctoral students by academic writing teachers and researchers for some time. For students for whom English is an additional language (EAL) in particular, the challenges are not only how to communicate this identity effectively in English, but also how to develop from a writer who simply ventriloquizes the voices of scholarly others to an author who writes with authority and discipline-sp...
3 CitationsSource
#1Janne Morton (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 12
#2Neomy Storch (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 36
Last. Celia Thompson (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 12
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Abstract Over the last couple of decades, there has been a growing recognition of the complexity of academic writing, including an interest in how learners negotiate the contexts within which they learn to write. As teachers in an EAP program, we approached this study with an interest in how our multilingual students negotiate the demands of their written assignments within particular disciplinary communities. The focus of the paper is thus on students’ perceptions of what it means to “do” acade...
20 CitationsSource
Last. Celia Thompson (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 12
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#1Celia Thompson (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 12
#2Kathleen Gray (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 24
Last. Hyejeong Kim (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 7
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Abstract This study investigated how 20 university students described their collective and individual learning experiences using social media technologies (SMTs). Data consisted of transcribed focus group discussions, which were analysed for students' use of first person singular and plural pronouns as well as for the kinds of verbs they used to describe their learning. Findings indicate that none of the participants used first person plural pronouns more frequently than first person singular pr...
13 CitationsSource