Daniel T. Gilbert
Harvard University
EpistemologyPsychoanalysisFeelingSocial perceptionSocial relationDevelopmental psychologyAttributionSociologySocial psychology (sociology)PsychologyCognitionImpact biasCognitive psychologyCognitive biasEvent (relativity)PleasureDuration (philosophy)Affective forecastingHappinessPsycINFOKnow-howAffect (psychology)Social psychologySocial cognitionInformation processing
132Publications
65H-index
24.9kCitations
Publications 123
Newest
#1Daniel WagnerH-Index: 1
#1Daniel L. SchacterH-Index: 170
Last. Daniel M. WegnerH-Index: 85
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1 Citations
#1Jaime L. Kurtz (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 11
#2Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
Last. Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
view all 3 authors...
Abstract We predicted that a state of uncertainty would prolong a positive mood, but that people would not anticipate this when making affective forecasts. In Study 1, participants learned that they had won one prize (certain condition), two prizes (two-gift condition), or one of two prizes (uncertain condition). People in the uncertain condition were in a positive mood longer than people in the other two conditions. In Study 2, forecaster participants underestimated the benefits of uncertainty ...
62 CitationsSource
#1Carey K. Morewedge (Princeton University)H-Index: 27
#2Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
Last. Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
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The hedonic benefit of a gain (e.g., receiving 100) may be increased by segregating it into smaller unitsthat are distributed over time (e.g., receiving 0 on each of 2 days). However, if these units are too small(e.g., receiving 1¢ on each of 10,000 days), they may fall beneath the person’s hedonic limen and haveno hedonic benefit at all. Do people know where their limens lie? In 6 experiments, participants predictedthat the hedonic benefit of a large gain would be increased by segregating it...
24 CitationsSource
#1Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
#2Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
All animals can predict the hedonic consequences of events they've experienced before. But humans can predict the hedonic consequences of events they've never experienced by simulating those events in their minds. Scientists are beginning to understand how the brain simulates future events, how it uses those simulations to predict an event's hedonic consequences, and why these predictions so often go awry.
1,209 CitationsSource
#1Daniel T. GilbertH-Index: 65
#2Randy BucknerH-Index: 1
Last. 刘杰H-Index: 1
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当你什么都不做时你究竟在做什么?如果回答是“什么也没做”,从逻辑上看似乎是对的;但如果是一个涉及神经科学的题,那答案是错的。科学家经过大量的大脑扫描实验发现:当人在进行脑力活动时,大脑中主宰该活动的区域(相对较亮的区域)会变大。最新的研究表明,当大脑的一些区域变亮时其他的区域则变暗。当我们好像在做什么事的时候,这些变暗的区域处于休眠状态,而当我们好像什么也没做时,这些区域则相当活跃。那么,我们究竟在做什么呢?答案是“时间旅行”。
1 Citations
#1Deborah A. Kermer (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 3
#2Erin Driver-Linn (Harvard University)H-Index: 7
Last. Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
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Loss aversion occurs because people expect losses to have greater hedonic impact than gains of equal magnitude. In two studies, people predicted that losses in a gambling task would have greater hedonic impact than would gains of equal magnitude, but when people actually gambled, losses did not have as much of an emotional impact as they predicted. People overestimated the hedonic impact of losses because they underestimated their tendency to rationalize losses and overestimated their tendency t...
314 CitationsSource
#1Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
In this fascinating and often hilarious work - winner of the Royal Society of Science Prize 2007 - pre-eminent psychologist Daniel Gilbert shows how - and why - the majority of us have no idea how to make ourselves happy. We all want to be happy, but do we know how? When it comes to improving tomorrow at the expense of today, we're terrible at predicting how to please our future selves. In 'Stumbling on Happiness' Professor Daniel Gilbert combines psychology, neuroscience, economics and philosop...
782 Citations
#1Carey K. Morewedge (Harvard University)H-Index: 27
#2Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
Last. Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
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Atypical events are both memorable and unrepresentative of their class. We tested the hypotheses that (a) people tend to recall atypical instances of events, and (b) when they are unaware of this, they rely on these atypical instances in forecasting their affective reactions to future events. In three studies, participants who were asked to recall an instance of an event and participants who were asked to recall an atypical instance of an event recalled equally atypical instances. However, only ...
246 CitationsSource
#1Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
#2Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
People base many decisions on affective forecasts, predictions about their emotional reactions to future events. They often display an impact bias, overestimating the intensity and duration of their emotional reactions to such events. One cause of the impact bias is focalism, the tendency to underestimate the extent to which other events will influence our thoughts and feelings. Another is people's failure to anticipate how quickly they will make sense of things that happen to them in a way that...
1,114 CitationsSource
#1Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
#2David B. Centerbar (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 6
Last. Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
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The authors hypothesized that uncertainty following a positive event prolongs the pleasure it causes and that people are generally unaware of this effect of uncertainty. In 3 experimental settings, people experienced a positive event (e.g., received an unexpected gift of a dollar coin attached to an index card) under conditions of certainty or uncertainty (e.g., it was easy or difficult to make sense of the text on the card). As predicted, people's positive moods lasted longer in the uncertain c...
534 CitationsSource