Daniel T. Gilbert
Harvard University
EpistemologyPsychoanalysisFeelingSocial perceptionSocial relationDevelopmental psychologyAttributionSociologySocial psychology (sociology)PsychologyCognitionImpact biasCognitive psychologyCognitive biasEvent (relativity)PleasureDuration (philosophy)Affective forecastingHappinessPsycINFOKnow-howAffect (psychology)Social psychologySocial cognitionInformation processing
132Publications
65H-index
24.9kCitations
Publications 123
Newest
#1Daniel L. SchacterH-Index: 170
#2Daniel T. GilbertH-Index: 65
Last. Bruce HoodH-Index: 1
view all 4 authors...
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#1Daniel L. SchacterH-Index: 170
#2Daniel T. GilbertH-Index: 65
Last. Bruce HoodH-Index: 1
view all 4 authors...
Source
#1Minha Lee (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 6
#2Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
Last. Xyle Ku (SNU: Seoul National University)H-Index: 1
view all 5 authors...
Members of East Asian cultures are more likely to conform in public settings than are members of Western cultures. Little research has examined, however, whether East Asians are more likely to privately accept the views held by others. In two studies we gave European American and Korean participants descriptions of unusual food combinations, information about how much one peer had liked the food combinations, or both kinds of information, and asked them to predict how much they would like the fo...
1 CitationsSource
#1Casey Eggleston (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 5
#2Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
Last. Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
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When predicting how much they will like something they have not encountered before, people use three commonsense theories: It is better to have a description of the attitude object than to know how someone else felt about it (“I know better than others”), better to know how a friend felt about it than how a stranger felt (“birds of a feather”), and better to get advice from friends—how much they think we will like it—than to know how they felt about it (“my friends know me”). We present evidence...
10 CitationsSource
#1Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
#2Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
Last. Casey L. Brown (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 7
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We thank Fox et al. (2014) for their interest in our research and welcome this opportunity to respond to their commentary. They argue that participants in our studies enjoyed “just thinking” more than we claimed (Wilson et al., 2014). We found some irony in their position, because we began this line of research with a similar hypothesis. As the data came in we were surprised that participants did not enjoy deliberative thought very much, even when we went to some lengths to give them time to pre...
Source
#1Gus Cooney (Harvard University)H-Index: 5
#2Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
Last. Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
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People seek extraordinary experiences—from drinking rare wines and taking exotic vacations to jumping from airplanes and shaking hands with celebrities. But are such experiences worth having? We found that participants thoroughly enjoyed having experiences that were superior to those had by their peers, but that having had such experiences spoiled their subsequent social interactions and ultimately left them feeling worse than they would have felt if they had had an ordinary experience instead. ...
23 CitationsSource
#1Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
#2David A. Reinhard (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 5
Last. Adi Shaked (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 3
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In 11 studies, we found that participants typically did not enjoy spending 6 to 15 minutes in a room by themselves with nothing to do but think, that they enjoyed doing mundane external activities much more, and that many preferred to administer electric shocks to themselves instead of being left alone with their thoughts. Most people seem to prefer to be doing something rather than nothing, even if that something is negative.
175 CitationsSource
#1Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
#2Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
A substantial body of research on affective forecasting has found that people often overestimate the affective impact of future events. Levine, Lench, Kaplan, and Safer (2012) argued that whereas people may overestimate the duration of their emotional responses, they do not overestimate the initial intensity of these responses as much as previous research has suggested. We suggest that Levine et al. (a) failed to review or include in their meta-analysis many studies that directly contradict thei...
39 CitationsSource
#1Cheryl Hahn (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 4
#2Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
Last. Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
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Do people take risks to obtain rewards or experience suspense? We hypothesized that people vulnerable to gambling are motivated more by the allure of winning money whereas people less vulnerable to gambling are motivated more by the allure of suspense. Consistent with this hypothesis, participants with high scores on a subscale of the Gambling Attitudes and Beliefs Survey—a measure of vulnerability to gambling— reported more of a motivation to earn money (pilot study), were more likely to accept...
7 CitationsSource
#1Jordi Quoidbach (National Fund for Scientific Research)H-Index: 20
#2Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
Last. Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
view all 3 authors...
We measured the personalities, values, and preferences of more than 19,000 people who ranged in age from 18 to 68 and asked them to report how much they had changed in the past decade and/or to predict how much they would change in the next decade. Young people, middle-aged people, and older people all believed they had changed a lot in the past but would change relatively little in the future. People, it seems, regard the present as a watershed moment at which they have finally become the perso...
126 CitationsSource