Hyeon Jeong Lee
Boston University
OpticsCancerBiophysicsInternal medicineEndocrinologyMicroscopyHyperspectral imagingVoltageRaman scatteringUltrashort pulseMembrane potentialChemistryMaterials scienceLipid dropletCholesteryl esterPTENProstate cancerLabel freeSpectroscopyMicrosecondRaman spectroscopyMembraneNuclear magnetic resonanceOptoelectronicsCancer researchProtein kinase BPI3K/AKT/mTOR pathwayBiology
35Publications
11H-index
770Citations
Publications 31
Newest
#1Haonan Lin (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 9
#2Hyeon Jeong Lee (ZJU: Zhejiang University)H-Index: 11
Last. Ji-Xin Cheng (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 84
view all 11 authors...
Label-free vibrational imaging by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) provides unprecedented insight into real-time chemical distributions. Specifically, SRS in the fingerprint region (400–1800 cm−1) can resolve multiple chemicals in a complex bio-environment. However, due to the intrinsic weak Raman cross-sections and the lack of ultrafast spectral acquisition schemes with high spectral fidelity, SRS in the fingerprint region is not viable for studying living cells or large-scale tissue samples. ...
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#1Haonan Lin (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 9
#2Yuying Tan (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 6
Last. Ji-Xin Cheng (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 84
view all 4 authors...
Hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (hSRS) is a label-free microspectroscopic modality that enables live-cell metabolic imaging with chemical specificity. Yet, hSRS in the CH region has low throughput and poor chemical specificity, which limits its application to a broader range of metabolic studies. We propose a high-content, high-throughput hSRS imaging method by a sparsity-driven spectral unmixing and active spectral sub-sampling. We unprecedently generate chemical maps of four major me...
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#1Hyeon Jeong Lee (ZJU: Zhejiang University)H-Index: 11
Label-free phenotypic classification at a single-cell level is a challenging yet important task in cell biology. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy provides high chemical selectivity and sensitivity for label-free imaging of biological samples. With the capability to record hyperspectral SRS images with high-speed, mapping of biomolecules inside living cells enables label-free phenotyping. However, like all high-dimensional data, it remains challenging to fully exploit the excessive am...
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#1Minghua Zhuge (ZJU: Zhejiang University)H-Index: 5
#2Kai-Chih Huang (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 9
Last. Ji-Xin Cheng (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 84
view all 11 authors...
High-sensitivity chemical imaging offers a window to decipher the molecular orchestra inside a living system. Based on vibrational fingerprint signatures, coherent Raman scattering microscopy provides a label-free approach to map biomolecules and drug molecules inside a cell. Yet, by near-infrared (NIR) pulse excitation, the sensitivity is limited to millimolar concentration for endogenous biomolecules. Here, the imaging sensitivity of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is significantly boosted f...
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#1Hyeon Jeong Lee (ZJU: Zhejiang University)H-Index: 11
#2Ji-Xin ChengH-Index: 84
Voltage imaging has become an emerging technique to record membrane potential change in living cells. Yet, compared to electrophysiology, microscopy approaches are still limited to relative membrane voltage changes, lacking important information conveyed by absolute membrane voltage. This talk will cover a spectroscopy approach to tackle this challenge. A spectroscopic signature of membrane potential was identified through stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging, which enabled label-free, sub-...
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#1Hyeon Jeong Lee (ZJU: Zhejiang University)H-Index: 11
#2Zhicong Chen (BU: Boston University)
Last. Ji-Xin Cheng (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 84
view all 7 authors...
Identifying metabolic alterations in disease progression has been challenged by difficulties in tracking metabolites at sub-cellular level. Here, by high-resolution stimulated Raman scattering and pump-probe imaging and spectral phasor analysis of melanoma cells grouped by MITF/AXL expression pattern and of human patient tissues paired by primary and metastatic status, we identify a metabolic switch from a pigment-containing phenotype in low-grade melanoma to a lipid-rich phenotype in metastatic...
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#1Marianne Collard (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 1
#2George Chen (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 10
Last. Rhoda M. Alani (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 30
view all 7 authors...
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#1Jiayingzi Wu (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 3
#2Hyeon Jeong Lee (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 11
Last. Ji-Xin Cheng (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 84
view all 11 authors...
Development of molecular probes holds great promise for early diagnosis of aggressive prostate cancer. Here, 2-[3-(1,3-dicarboxypropyl) ureido] pentanedioic acid (DUPA)-conjugated ligand and bis-isoindigo-based polymer (BTII) are synthesized to formulate semiconducting polymer nanoparticles (BTII-DUPA SPN) as a prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted probe for prostate cancer imaging in the NIR-II window. Insights into the interaction of the imaging probes with the biological targets ...
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#1Shamit Shrivastava (University of Oxford)H-Index: 12
#2Hyeon Jeong Lee (ZJU: Zhejiang University)H-Index: 11
Last. Ji-Xin Cheng (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 84
view all 3 authors...
It has previously been suggested that the plasma membrane condenses and melts reversibly during an action potential in a neuron. If true it has fundamental consequences for our understanding of the regulation of biological functions during an action potential. It has long been known that the electrical dipoles in the neuronal membrane reorient during an action potential, observed through a variety of optical methods. However, this information has been insufficient to confirm if and how the colle...
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#1Shamit Shrivastava (University of Oxford)H-Index: 12
#2Hyeon Jeong Lee (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 11
Last. Ji-Xin Cheng (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 84
view all 3 authors...
Abstract It has previously been suggested that the plasma membrane condenses and melts reversibly during an action potential in a neuron. If true it has fundamental consequences for our understanding of the regulation of biological functions during an action potential. It has long been known that the electrical dipoles in the neuronal membrane reorient during an action potential, observed through a variety of optical methods. However, this information has been insufficient to confirm if and how ...
Source
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