Kimberly D. Miller
American Cancer Society
EpidemiologyCancerInternal medicineEthnic groupOncologyDemographyMortality rateYoung adultLung cancerSurvival rateDiseaseProstate cancerCancer preventionRelative survivalPopulationCancer Death RateCancer incidencePacific islandersIncidence (epidemiology)Colorectal cancerMedicineGerontology
47Publications
28H-index
69.5kCitations
Publications 40
Newest
#1Kimberly D. Miller (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 28
#2Ostrom Q (Duke University)H-Index: 1
Last. Rebecca L. Siegel (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 67
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Brain and other central nervous system (CNS) tumors are among the most fatal cancers and account for substantial morbidity and mortality in the United States. Population-based data from the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (a combined data set of the National Program of Cancer Registries [NPCR] and Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results [SEER] registries), NPCR, National Vital Statistics System and SEER program were analyzed to assess the contemporary burden of malignant an...
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#1Kimberly D. Miller (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 28
#2Rebecca L. Siegel (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 67
Last. Huann Sheng ChenH-Index: 19
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Background: null The American Cancer Society (ACS) and the NCI collaborate every 5 to 8 years to update the methods for estimating the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths in the current year for the U.S. and individual states. Herein, we compare our current projection methodology with the next generation of statistical models. null Methods: null A validation study was conducted comparing current projection methods (vector autoregression for incidence; Joinpoint regression for mortality) with ...
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#1Benmei LiuH-Index: 6
#1Benmei Liu (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 1
Last. Eric J. FeuerH-Index: 79
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Background: The American Cancer Society (ACS) and the National Cancer Institute collaborate every 5-8 years to update the methods for estimating numbers of new cancer cases and deaths in the current year in the U.S. and in every state and the District of Columbia. In this paper, we re-evaluate the statistical method for estimating unavailable historical incident cases which are needed for projecting the current year counts. Methods: We compared the current county-level model developed in 2012 (M...
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#1Rebecca L. SiegelH-Index: 67
#2Kimberly D. MillerH-Index: 28
Last. Ahmedin JemalH-Index: 139
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#1Gonçalo ForjazH-Index: 3
#2Jill S. Barnholtz-Sloan (Case Western Reserve University)H-Index: 76
Last. Nirav PatilH-Index: 7
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Background There are over 100 histologically distinct types of primary malignant and nonmalignant brain and other central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Our study presents recent trends in the incidence of these tumors using an updated histology recode that incorporates major diagnostic categories listed in the 2016 World Health Organization Classification of Tumours of the CNS. Methods We used data from the SEER-21 registries for patients of all ages diagnosed in 2000-2017. We calculated age-adju...
2 CitationsSource
#1Rebecca L. Siegel (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 67
#2Kimberly D. Miller (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 28
Last. Ahmedin Jemal (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 139
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Each year, the American Cancer Society estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths in the United States and compiles the most recent data on population-based cancer occurrence. Incidence data (through 2017) were collected by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program; the National Program of Cancer Registries; and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Mortality data (through 2018) were collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. In 2021, 1...
704 CitationsSource
#1Kimberly D. Miller (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 28
Last. Rebecca L. Siegel (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 67
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Cancer statistics for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) (aged 15-39 years) are often presented in aggregate, masking important heterogeneity. The authors analyzed population-based cancer incidence and mortality for AYAs in the United States by age group (ages 15-19, 20-29, and 30-39 years), sex, and race/ethnicity. In 2020, there will be approximately 89,500 new cancer cases and 9270 cancer deaths in AYAs. Overall cancer incidence increased in all AYA age groups during the most recent decade (...
72 CitationsSource
#1Jingxuan Zhao (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 9
#2Kimberly D. Miller (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 28
Last. K. Robin Yabroff (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 64
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Background Little is known about disparities in economic burden due to premature cancer deaths by race or ethnicity in the United States. This study aimed to compare person-years of life lost (PYLLs) and lost earnings due to premature cancer deaths by race/ethnicity. Methods PYLLs were calculated using recent national cancer death and life expectancy data. PYLLs were combined with annual median earnings to generate lost earnings. We compared PYLLs and lost earnings among individuals who died at ...
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#1Farhad Islami (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 74
#2Ann Goding Sauer (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 22
Last. Ahmedin Jemal (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 139
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Information on cutaneous melanoma (melanoma) burden attributable to ultraviolet (UV) radiation by state could inform state and local public health policies to mitigate the burden. We estimated numbers, proportions and age-standardized incidence rates of malignant melanomas attributable to UV radiation in each US state by calculating the difference between observed melanomas during 2011-2015 and expected cases based on historically low incidence rates among whites in Connecticut from 1942 to 1954...
2 CitationsSource