Howard Schuman
University of Michigan
Gender studiesEpistemologyPublic opinionWorld War IIRacismSociologyPsychologySurvey researchPolitical scienceLawSocial changeInterviewContext (language use)Meaning (existential)PopulationPoison controlSocial sciencePublic relationsSample (statistics)Vietnam WarWhite (horse)Collective memoryContext effectRace (biology)Social psychologyPoliticsHistory
143Publications
56H-index
9,178Citations
Publications 141
Newest
#1Howard SchumanH-Index: 56
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#1Howard Schuman (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 56
#2Amy Corning (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 11
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#1Howard SchumanH-Index: 56
Surveys are extensions of our natural tendencies to seek information by means of questioning and to learn about wholes by selecting parts. It is true that each of the steps in a survey introduces the possibility of one or more artifacts, but these same dangers allow opportunities for deeper understanding of both responses and respondents. Examples are presented of artifacts and opportunities, as the case may be.
#1David DeanH-Index: 1
#2Yana MeerzonH-Index: 4
Last. Jane GreerH-Index: 2
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“History, Memory, Performance” Dean, David, Yana Meerzon & Kathryn Prince, History, Memory, Performance, Palgrave MacMillan, 2014, 312 p. History, Memory, Performance is an interdisciplinary collection of essays exploring performances of the past in a wide range of trans-national and historical contexts ranging from seventeenth century New France and nineteenth-century Russia to modern Australia, Brazil, Britain, Canada, Lebanon, Russia, and the United States. Contributions from theatre schol...
#1Amy CorningH-Index: 11
#2Howard SchumanH-Index: 56
When discussing large social trends or experiences, we tend to group people into generations. But what does it mean to be part of a generation, and what gives that group meaning and coherence? It's collective memory, say Amy Corning and Howard Schuman, and in Generations and Collective Memory, they draw on an impressive range of research to show how generations share memories of formative experiences, and how understanding the way those memories form and change can help us understand society and...
#1Howard Schuman (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 56
#2Amy Corning (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 11
Sociologists and psychologists have independently identified the same general period in individual development for the formation of many memories. Yet the cross-disciplinary similarity is rarely recognized, because most psychologists study autobiographical memories of personal events, while sociologists focus on collective memories of national and world events. We examine autobiographical and collective memories together within a large national cross-section survey of Americans. Both types of me...
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#1Amy CorningH-Index: 11
#2Howard SchumanH-Index: 56
The collective memory field is characterized by diverse conceptualizations of the "social" or "collective" nature of memory, as well as by fundamentally different understandings of where collective memory resides. These differences coalesce into two perspectives on collective memory that have guided theoretical and empirical writing: one that focuses on representations and symbols that embody memory or act as its "vehicles", and one that focuses on subjective memories and views of the past held ...
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#1Amy CorningH-Index: 11
#2Vladas GaidysH-Index: 3
Last. Howard SchumanH-Index: 56
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Research on the distribution of collective memories in national populations has often been conducted in relatively stable societies, where most individuals have experienced a limited range of event types. We examine collective memories in Lithuania, a society that has seen substantial change, using three surveys conducted during the two decades since Lithuanian protests against Soviet rule began in the late 1980s. We identify two types of events that individuals may recall, drawing on Sewell's (...
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#1Howard Schuman (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 56
#2Stanley PresserH-Index: 41
Sociologists Howard Schuman and Stanley Presser explore how proponents of requiring police permits for purchasing a gun are the majority of the public and say they feel more strongly about the issue than do opponents. But when it comes to taking action on the issue, it is the opponents who form the clear majority.
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